Bayes theorem, and making probability intuitive – by 3Blue1Brown

This video I’ve been meaning to watch for a while now. It another great visual explanation of a statistics topic by the 3Blue1Brown Youtube channel (which I’ve covered before, multiple times). This time, it’s all about Bayes theorem, and I just love how Grant Sanderson explains the concept so visually. He argues that rather then…

CodeWars: Learn programming through test-driven development

As I wrote about Project Euler and CodingGame before, someone recommended me CodeWars. CodeWars offers free online learning exercises to develop your programming skills through fun daily challenges. In line with Project Euler, you are tasked with solving increasingly complex programming challenges. At CodeWars, these little problems you need to solve with code are called…

How to Read Scientific Papers

Cover image via wikihow.com/Read-a-Scientific-Paper Reddit is a treasure trove of random stuff. However, every now and then, in the better groups, quite valuable topics pop up. Here’s one I came across on r/statistics: Particularly the advice by grandzooby seemed worth a like, and he linked to several useful resources which I’ve summarized for you below….

Finland's free online AI crash course

Finland developed a crash course on AI to educate its citizens. The course was arguably a great local success, with over 50 thousand Fins taking the course (1% of the population). Now, as a gift to the European Union, Finland has opened up the course for the rest of Europe and the world to enjoy….

The Causal Inference Book: DAGS and more

Harvard (bio)statisticians Miguel Hernan and Jamie Robins just released their new book, online and accessible for free! The Causal Inference book provides a cohesive presentation of causal inference, its concepts and its methods. The book is divided in 3 parts of increasing difficulty: causal inference without models, causal inference with models, and causal inference from…

Dynamic Programming MIT Course

Cover image by xkcd Over the last months I’ve been working my way through Project Euler in my spare time. I wanted to learn Python programming, and what better way than solving mini-problems and -projects?! Well, Project Euler got a ton of these, listed in increasing order of difficulty. It starts out simple: to solve…

Tidy Machine Learning with R’s purrr and tidyr

Jared Wilber posted this great walkthrough where he codes a simple R data pipeline using purrr and tidyr to train a large variety of models and methods on the same base data, all in a non-repetitive, reproducible, clean, and thus tidy fashion. Really impressive workflow!

Learn Git Branching: An Interactive Tutorial

Peter Cottle built this great interactive Git tutorial that teaches you all vital branching skills right in your browser. It’s interactive, beautiful, and very informative, introducing every concept and Git command in a step-by-step fashion. Have a look yourself: https://learngitbranching.js.org/ Here’s the associated GitHub repository for those interested in forking. The tutorial includes many levels…

Artificial Stupidity – by Vincent Warmerdam @PyData 2019 London

PyData is famous for it’s great talks on machine learning topics. This 2019 London edition, Vincent Warmerdam again managed to give a super inspiring presentation. This year he covers what he dubs Artificial Stupidity™. You should definitely watch the talk, which includes some great visual aids, but here are my main takeaways: Vincent speaks of…