The Causal Inference Book: DAGS and more

Harvard (bio)statisticians Miguel Hernan and Jamie Robins just released their new book, online and accessible for free! The Causal Inference book provides a cohesive presentation of causal inference, its concepts and its methods. The book is divided in 3 parts of increasing difficulty: causal inference without models, causal inference with models, and causal inference from…

Overviews of Graph Classification and Network Clustering methods

Thanks to Sebastian Raschka I am able to share this great GitHub overview page of relevant graph classification techniques, and the scientific papers behind them. The overview divides the algorithms into four groups: Factorization Spectral and Statistical Fingerprints Deep Learning Graph Kernels Moreover, the overview contains links to similar collections on community detection, classification/regression trees and gradient boosting papers…

2019 Shortlist for the Royal Society Prize for Science Books

Since 1988, the Royal Society has celebrated outstanding popular science writing and authors. Each year, a panel of expert judges choose the book that they believe makes popular science writing compelling and accessible to the public. Over the decades, the Prize has celebrated some notable winners including Bill Bryson and Stephen Hawking. The author of the winning…

ROC, AUC, precision, and recall visually explained

A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve displays how well a model can classify binary outcomes. An ROC curve is generated by plotting the false positive rate of a model against its true positive rate, for each possible cutoff value. Often, the area under the curve (AUC) is calculated and used as a metric showing how well…

Understanding Data Distributions

Having trouble understanding how to interpret distribution plots? Or struggling with Q-Q plots? Sven Halvorson penned down a visual tutorial explaining distributions using visualisations of their quantiles. Because each slice of the distribution is 5% of the total area and the height of the graph is changing, the slices have different widths. It’s like we’re…

Artificial Stupidity – by Vincent Warmerdam @PyData 2019 London

PyData is famous for it’s great talks on machine learning topics. This 2019 London edition, Vincent Warmerdam again managed to give a super inspiring presentation. This year he covers what he dubs Artificial Stupidity™. You should definitely watch the talk, which includes some great visual aids, but here are my main takeaways: Vincent speaks of…

E-Book: Probabilistic Programming & Bayesian Methods for Hackers

The Bayesian method is the natural approach to inference, yet it is hidden from readers behind chapters of slow, mathematical analysis. Nevertheless, mathematical analysis is only one way to “think Bayes”. With cheap computing power, we can now afford to take an alternate route via probabilistic programming. Cam Davidson-Pilon wrote the book Bayesian Methods for…

Helpful resources for A/B testing

Brandon Rohrer — (former) data scientist at Microsoft, iRobot, and Facebook — asked his network on Twitter and LinkedIn to share their favorite resources on A/B testing. It produced a nice list, which I summarized below. The order is somewhat arbitrary, and somewhat based on my personal appreciation of the resources. Course: A/B-testing by Google…

5 Quick Tips for Coding in the Classroom, by Kelly Bodwin

Kelly Bodwin is an Assistant Professor of Statistics at Cal Poly (San Luis Obispo) and teaches multiple courses in statistical programming. Based on her experiences, she compiled this great shortlist of five great tips to teach programming. Kelly truly mentions some best practices, so have a look at the original article, which she summarized as…