Author: Paul van der Laken

Google’s Guidebook for Developing AI Product Development

Google’s Guidebook for Developing AI Product Development

I came across another great set of curated resources by one of the teams at Google:

The People + AI Guidebook.

The People + AI Guidebook was written to help user experience (UX) professionals and product managers follow a human-centered approach to AI.

The Guidebookโ€™s recommendations are based on data and insights from over a hundred individuals across Google product teams, industry experts, and academic research.

These six chapters follow the product development flow, and each one has a related worksheet to help turn guidance into action.

The People & AI guidebook is one of the products of the major PAIR project team (People & AI Research).

Here are the direct links to the six guidebook chapters:

Links to the related worksheets you can find here.

Repository of Production Machine Learning

Repository of Production Machine Learning

The Institute for Ethical Machine Learning compiled this amazing curated list of open source libraries that will help you deploy, monitor, version, scale, and secure your production machine learning.

๐Ÿ” Explaining predictions & models๐Ÿ” Privacy preserving ML๐Ÿ“œ Model & data versioning
๐Ÿ Model Training Orchestration๐Ÿ’ช Model Serving and Monitoring๐Ÿค– Neural Architecture Search
๐Ÿ““ Reproducible Notebooks๐Ÿ“Š Visualisation frameworks๐Ÿ”  Industry-strength NLP
๐Ÿงต Data pipelines & ETL๐Ÿท๏ธ Data Labelling๐Ÿ—ž๏ธ Data storage
๐Ÿ“ก Functions as a service๐Ÿ—บ๏ธ Computation distribution๐Ÿ“ฅ Model serialisation
๐Ÿงฎ Optimized calculation frameworks๐Ÿ’ธ Data Stream Processing๐Ÿ”ด Outlier and Anomaly Detection
๐ŸŒ€ Feature engineering๐ŸŽ Feature Storesโš” Adversarial Robustness
๐Ÿ’ฐ Commercial Platforms
Direct links to the sections of the Github repo

The Institute for Ethical Machine Learning is a think-tank that brings together with technology leaders, policymakers & academics to develop standards for ML.

Handling and Converting Data Types in Python Pandas

Handling and Converting Data Types in Python Pandas

Data types are one of those things that you donโ€™t tend to care about until you get an error or some unexpected results. It is also one of the first things you should check once you load a new data into pandas for furtherย analysis.

Chris Moffit

In this short tutorial, Chris shows how to the pandas dtypes map to the numpy and base Python data types.

A screenshot of the data type mapping.

Moreover, Chris demonstrates how to handle and convert data types so you can speed up your data analysis. Both using custom functions and anonymous lambda functions.

A snapshot from the original blog.

A very handy guide indeed, after which you will be able to read in your datasets into Python in the right format from the get-go!

Using data type casting, lambda functions, and functional programming to read in data in Python. Via pbpython.com/pandas_dtypes.html

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

Jon Schwabisch recently proposed ten guidelines for better table design.

Next to the academic paper, Jon shared his recommendations in a Twitter thread.

Let me summarize them for you:

  • Right-align your numbers
  • Left-align your texts
  • Use decimals appropriately (one or two is often enough)
  • Display units (e.g., $, %) sparsely (e.g., only on first row)
  • Highlight outliers
  • Highlight column headers
  • Use subtle highlights and dividers
  • Use white space between rows and columns
  • Use white space (or dividers) to highlight groups
  • Use visualizations for large tables
Afbeelding
Highlights in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290324966190338049/photo/2
Afbeelding
Visualizations in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325409570197509/photo/3
Afbeelding
Example of a well-organized table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325663543627784/photo/2
How most statistical tests are linear models

How most statistical tests are linear models

Jonas Kristoffer Lindelรธv wrote a great visual explanation of how the most common statistical tests (t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, etc) are all linear models in the back-end.

Jonas’ original blog uses R programming to visually show how the tests work, what the linear models look like, and how different approaches result in the same statistics.

George Ho later remade a Python programming version of the same visual explanation.

If I was thought statistics and methodology this way, I sure would have struggled less! Have a look yourself: https://lindeloev.github.io/tests-as-linear/

The 10 Fundamental Concepts of JavaScript

The 10 Fundamental Concepts of JavaScript

Another pearl of a resource on Twitter is this thread by Madison on 10 of fundamentalal concepts of Javascript — and programming in general for that matter.

For your convience, I copied the links below. Just click them to browse to the resource and learn more about the concept

Click to learn more about each concept

  1. Variables & Scoping
  2. Data types
  3. Objects, Funtions & Arrays
  4. Document Object Model (DOM)
  5. Prototypes & this.
  6. Events
  7. Flow Control (specifically, for-loops)
  8. Security & (web) Accesibility
  9. Good coding practices (to which I’ve linked before)
  10. Async

This 10-step list was compiled as apart of this interesting podcast, which I recommend you listen to as well.

Want to learn more?

According to many, this is the best book to continue learning more about JavaScript.

There’s a (now classic) conference talk that comes with this book, which I can also recommend you watch: