Tag: programming

Create a publication-ready correlation matrix, with significance levels, in R

Create a publication-ready correlation matrix, with significance levels, in R

In most (observational) research papers you read, you will probably run into a correlation matrix. Often it looks something like this:

FACTOR ANALYSIS

In Social Sciences, like Psychology, researchers like to denote the statistical significance levels of the correlation coefficients, often using asterisks (i.e., *). Then the table will look more like this:

Table 4 from Family moderators of relation between community ...

Regardless of my personal preferences and opinions, I had to make many of these tables for the scientific (non-)publications of my Ph.D..

I remember that, when I first started using R, I found it quite difficult to generate these correlation matrices automatically.

Yes, there is the cor function, but it does not include significance levels.

Then there the (in)famous Hmisc package, with its rcorr function. But this tool provides a whole new range of issues.

What’s this storage.mode, and what are we trying to coerce again?

Soon you figure out that Hmisc::rcorr only takes in matrices (thus with only numeric values). Hurray, now you can run a correlation analysis on your dataframe, you think…

Yet, the output is all but publication-ready!

You wanted one correlation matrix, but now you have two… Double the trouble?

To spare future scholars the struggle of the early day R programming, I would like to share my custom function correlation_matrix.

My correlation_matrix takes in a dataframe, selects only the numeric (and boolean/logical) columns, calculates the correlation coefficients and p-values, and outputs a fully formatted publication-ready correlation matrix!

You can specify many formatting options in correlation_matrix.

For instance, you can use only 2 decimals. You can focus on the lower triangle (as the lower and upper triangle values are identical). And you can drop the diagonal values:

Or maybe you are interested in a different type of correlation coefficients, and not so much in significance levels:

For other formatting options, do have a look at the source code below.

Now, to make matters even more easy, I wrote a second function (save_correlation_matrix) to directly save any created correlation matrices:

Once you open your new correlation matrix file in Excel, it is immediately ready to be copy-pasted into Word!

If you are looking for ways to visualize your correlations do have a look at the packages corrr and corrplot.

I hope my functions are of help to you!

Do reach out if you get to use them in any of your research papers!

I would be super interested and feel honored.

correlation_matrix

#' correlation_matrix
#' Creates a publication-ready / formatted correlation matrix, using `Hmisc::rcorr` in the backend.
#'
#' @param df dataframe; containing numeric and/or logical columns to calculate correlations for
#' @param type character; specifies the type of correlations to compute; gets passed to `Hmisc::rcorr`; options are `"pearson"` or `"spearman"`; defaults to `"pearson"`
#' @param digits integer/double; number of decimals to show in the correlation matrix; gets passed to `formatC`; defaults to `3`
#' @param decimal.mark character; which decimal.mark to use; gets passed to `formatC`; defaults to `.`
#' @param use character; which part of the correlation matrix to display; options are `"all"`, `"upper"`, `"lower"`; defaults to `"all"`
#' @param show_significance boolean; whether to add `*` to represent the significance levels for the correlations; defaults to `TRUE`
#' @param replace_diagonal boolean; whether to replace the correlations on the diagonal; defaults to `FALSE`
#' @param replacement character; what to replace the diagonal and/or upper/lower triangles with; defaults to `""` (empty string)
#'
#' @return a correlation matrix
#' @export
#'
#' @examples
#' `correlation_matrix(iris)`
#' `correlation_matrix(mtcars)`
correlation_matrix <- function(df, 
                               type = "pearson",
                               digits = 3, 
                               decimal.mark = ".",
                               use = "all", 
                               show_significance = TRUE, 
                               replace_diagonal = FALSE, 
                               replacement = ""){
  
  # check arguments
  stopifnot({
    is.numeric(digits)
    digits >= 0
    use %in% c("all", "upper", "lower")
    is.logical(replace_diagonal)
    is.logical(show_significance)
    is.character(replacement)
  })
  # we need the Hmisc package for this
  require(Hmisc)
  
  # retain only numeric and boolean columns
  isNumericOrBoolean = vapply(df, function(x) is.numeric(x) | is.logical(x), logical(1))
  if (sum(!isNumericOrBoolean) > 0) {
    cat('Dropping non-numeric/-boolean column(s):', paste(names(isNumericOrBoolean)[!isNumericOrBoolean], collapse = ', '), '\n\n')
  }
  df = df[isNumericOrBoolean]
  
  # transform input data frame to matrix
  x <- as.matrix(df)
  
  # run correlation analysis using Hmisc package
  correlation_matrix <- Hmisc::rcorr(x, type = type)
  R <- correlation_matrix$r # Matrix of correlation coeficients
  p <- correlation_matrix$P # Matrix of p-value 
  
  # transform correlations to specific character format
  Rformatted = formatC(R, format = 'f', digits = digits, decimal.mark = decimal.mark)
  
  # if there are any negative numbers, we want to put a space before the positives to align all
  if (sum(!is.na(R) & R < 0) > 0) {
    Rformatted = ifelse(!is.na(R) & R > 0, paste0(" ", Rformatted), Rformatted)
  }

  # add significance levels if desired
  if (show_significance) {
    # define notions for significance levels; spacing is important.
    stars <- ifelse(is.na(p), "", ifelse(p < .001, "***", ifelse(p < .01, "**", ifelse(p < .05, "*", ""))))
    Rformatted = paste0(Rformatted, stars)
  }
  
  # make all character strings equally long
  max_length = max(nchar(Rformatted))
  Rformatted = vapply(Rformatted, function(x) {
    current_length = nchar(x)
    difference = max_length - current_length
    return(paste0(x, paste(rep(" ", difference), collapse = ''), sep = ''))
  }, FUN.VALUE = character(1))
  
  # build a new matrix that includes the formatted correlations and their significance stars
  Rnew <- matrix(Rformatted, ncol = ncol(x))
  rownames(Rnew) <- colnames(Rnew) <- colnames(x)
  
  # replace undesired values
  if (use == 'upper') {
    Rnew[lower.tri(Rnew, diag = replace_diagonal)] <- replacement
  } else if (use == 'lower') {
    Rnew[upper.tri(Rnew, diag = replace_diagonal)] <- replacement
  } else if (replace_diagonal) {
    diag(Rnew) <- replacement
  }
  
  return(Rnew)
}

save_correlation_matrix

#' save_correlation_matrix
#' Creates and save to file a fully formatted correlation matrix, using `correlation_matrix` and `Hmisc::rcorr` in the backend
#' @param df dataframe; passed to `correlation_matrix`
#' @param filename either a character string naming a file or a connection open for writing. "" indicates output to the console; passed to `write.csv`
#' @param ... any other arguments passed to `correlation_matrix`
#'
#' @return NULL
#'
#' @examples
#' `save_correlation_matrix(df = iris, filename = 'iris-correlation-matrix.csv')`
#' `save_correlation_matrix(df = mtcars, filename = 'mtcars-correlation-matrix.csv', digits = 3, use = 'lower')`
save_correlation_matrix = function(df, filename, ...) {
  return(write.csv2(correlation_matrix(df, ...), file = filename))
}

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Best Tech & Programming Talks Ever

Best Tech & Programming Talks Ever

Every now and then, Twitter will offer these golden resources.

Ashley Willis recently asked people to name the best tech talk they’ve ever seen and the results are a resource I don’t want to lose.

Hundreds of people responded, sharing their contenders for the title.

Below, I selected some of the top-rated talks and clustered them accordingly. Click a category to jump to the section.


Big Idea & Programming Meta-Talks

The Future of Programming

Growing a Language

The Mess We’re In

Making Users Awesome

Ethical Dilemmas in Software Engineering


Testing code

Adding Eyes to Your Test Automation Framework

TATFT – Test All The F*cking Time


Language-Specific talks

Concurrency (Python)

How we program multicores (erlang)

Y Not- Adventures in Functional Programming (Ruby)

JavaScript: The Good Parts


Code Design

Core Design Principles for Software Developers

Design Patterns vs Anti pattern in APL


Containers & Kubernetes

The Container Operator’s Manual

Write a Container in Go From Scratch

Container Hacks and Fun Images

Kubernetes and the Path to Serverless

Let’s Build Kubernetes, With a Spreadsheet and Volunteers

Cover image via: https://toggl.com/blog/best-tech-websites

David Robinson’s R Programming Screencasts

David Robinson’s R Programming Screencasts

David Robinson (aka drob) is one of the best known R programmers.

Since a couple of years David has been sharing his knowledge through streaming screencasts of him programming. It’s basically part of R’s #tidytuesday movement.

Alex Cookson decided to do us all a favor and annotate all these screencasts into a nice overview.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1pjj_G9ncJZPGTYPkR1BYwzA6bhJoeTfY2fJeGKSbOKM/edit#gid=444382177

Here you can search for video material of David using a specific function or method. There are already over a thousand linked fragments!

Very useful if you want to learn how to visualize data using ggplot2 or plotly, how to work with factors in forcats, or how to tidy data using tidyr and dplyr.

For instance, you could search for specific R functions and packages you want to learn about:

Thanks David for sharing your knowledge, and thanks Alex for maintaining this overview!

Tutorial: Demystifying Deep Learning for Data Scientists

Tutorial: Demystifying Deep Learning for Data Scientists

In this great tutorial for PyCon 2020, Eric Ma proposes a very simple framework for machine learning, consisting of only three elements:

  1. Model
  2. Loss function
  3. Optimizer

By adjusting the three elements in this simple framework, you can build any type of machine learning program.

In the tutorial, Eric shows you how to implement this same framework in Python (using jax) and implement linear regression, logistic regression, and artificial neural networks all in the same way (using gradient descent).

I can’t even begin to explain it as well as Eric does himself, so I highly recommend you watch and code along with the Youtube tutorial (~1 hour):

If you want to code along, here’s the github repository: github.com/ericmjl/dl-workshop

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes of a deep learning framework? Or what is going on behind that pre-trained model that you took from Kaggle? Then this tutorial is for you! In this tutorial, we will demystify the internals of deep learning frameworks – in the process equipping us with foundational knowledge that lets us understand what is going on when we train and fit a deep learning model. By learning the foundations without a deep learning framework as a pedagogical crutch, you will walk away with foundational knowledge that will give you the confidence to implement any model you want in any framework you choose.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGu3pPC_fBM
Free Springer Books during COVID19

Free Springer Books during COVID19

Update: Unfortunately, Springer removed the free access to its books.

Book publisher Springer just released over 400 book titles that can be downloaded free of charge following the corona-virus outbreak.

Here’s the full overview: https://link.springer.com/search?facet-content-type=%22Book%22&package=mat-covid19_textbooks&facet-language=%22En%22&sortOrder=newestFirst&showAll=true

Most of these books will normally set you back about $50 to $150, so this is a great deal!

There are many titles on computer science, programming, business, psychology, and here are some specific titles that might interest my readership:

Note that I only got to page 8 of 21, so there are many more free interesting titles out there!

Join 274 other followers

Think Like a Coder – TEDEd learning series

Think Like a Coder – TEDEd learning series

I stumbled across this TED Ed YouTube playlist called Think Like A Coder. It’s an amusing 10-episode video introduction for those new to programming and coding.

The series follows Ethic, a girl who wakes up in a prison, struck by amnesia, and thus without a clue how she got there. She meets Hedge, a robot she can program to help her escape and, later, save the world. However, she needs to learn how to code the Hedge’s instructions, and write efficient computer programs. Ethic and Hedge embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles.

Episode 1 covers loops.

The adventure begins!

Episode 1: Ethic awakens in a mysterious cell. Can she and robot Hedge solve the programming puzzles blocking their escape?