Tag: data

Become a Data Science Professional

Become a Data Science Professional

Amit Ness gathered an impressive list of learning resources for becoming a data scientist.

It’s great to see that he shares them publicly on his github so that others may follow along.

But beware, this learning guideline covers a multi-year process.

Amit’s personal motto seems to be “Becoming better at data science every day“.

Completing the hyperlinked list below will take you several hundreds days at the least!

Learning Philosophy:

Index

How a File Format Exposed a Crossword Scandal

Vincent Warmerdam shared this Youtube video which I thoroughly enjoyed watched. It’s about Saul Pwanson, a software engineer whose hobby project got a little out of hand.

In 2016, Saul Pwanson designed a plain-text file format for crossword puzzle data, and then spent a couple of months building a micro-data-pipeline, scraping tens of thousands of crosswords from various sources.

After putting all these crosswords in a simple uniform format, Saul used some simple command line commands to check for common patterns and irregularities.

Surprisingly enough, after visualizing the results, Saul discovered egregious plagiarism by a major crossword editor that had gone on for years.

Ultimately, 538 even covered the scandal:

I thoroughly enjoyed watching this talk on Youtube.

Saul covers the file format, data pipeline, and the design choices that aided rapid exploration; the evidence for the scandal, from the initial anomalies to the final damning visualization; and what it’s like for a data project to get 15 minutes of fame.

I tried to localize the dataset online, but it seems Saul’s website has since gone offline. If you do happen to find it, please do share it in the comments!

ppsr: An R implementation of the Predictive Power Score

ppsr: An R implementation of the Predictive Power Score

Update March, 2021: My R package for the predictive power score (ppsr) is live on CRAN!
Try install.packages("ppsr") in your R terminal to get the latest version.

A few months ago, I wrote about the Predictive Power Score (PPS): a handy metric to quickly explore and quantify the relationships in a dataset.

As a social scientist, I was taught to use a correlation matrix to describe the relationships in a dataset. Yet, in my opinion, the PPS provides three handy advantages:

  1. PPS works for any type of data, also nominal/categorical variables
  2. PPS quantifies non-linear relationships between variables
  3. PPS acknowledges the asymmetry of those relationships

Florian Wetschoreck came up with the PPS idea, wrote the original blog, and programmed a Python implementation of it (called ppscore).

Yet, I work mostly in R and I was very keen on incorporating this powertool into my general data science workflow.

So, over the holiday period, I did something I have never done before: I wrote an R package!

It’s called ppsr and you can find the code here on github.

Installation

# You can get the official version from CRAN:
install.packages("ppsr")

## Or you can get the development version from GitHub:
# install.packages('devtools')
# devtools::install_github('https://github.com/paulvanderlaken/ppsr')

Usage

The ppsr package has three main functions that compute PPS:

  • score() – which computes an x-y PPS
  • score_predictors() – which computes X-y PPS
  • score_matrix() – which computes X-Y PPS

Visualizing PPS

Subsequently, there are two main functions that wrap around these computational functions to help you visualize your PPS using ggplot2:

  • visualize_predictors() – producing a barplot of all X-y PPS
  • visualize_matrix() – producing a heatmap of all X-Y PPS
PPS matrix for iris

Note that Species is a nominal/categorical variable, with three character/text options.

A correlation matrix would not be able to show us that the type of iris Species can be predicted extremely well by the petal length and width, and somewhat by the sepal length and width. Yet, particularly sepal width is not easily predicted by the type of species.

Correlation matrix for iris

Exploring mtcars

It takes about 10 seconds to run 121 decision trees with visualize_matrix(mtcars). Yet, the output is much more informative than the correlation matrix:

  • cyl can be much better predicted by mpg than the other way around
  • the classification of vs can be done well using nearly all variables as predictors, except for am
  • yet, it’s hard to predict anything based on the vs classification
  • a cars’ am can’t be predicted at all using these variables
PPS matrix for mtcars

The correlation matrix does provides insights that are not provided by the PPS matrix. Most importantly, the sign and strength of any linear relationship that may exist. For instance, we can deduce that mpg relates strongly negatively with cyl.

Yet, even though half of the matrix does not provide any additional information (due to the symmetry), I still find it hard to derive the most important relations and insights at a first glance.

Moreover, the rows and columns for vs and am are not very informative in this correlation matrix as it contains pearson correlations coefficients by default, whereas vs and am are binary variables. The same can be said for cyl, gear and carb, which contain ordinal categories / integer data, so you can discuss the value of these coefficients depicted here.

Correlation matrix for mtcars

Exploring trees

In R, there are many datasets built in via the datasets package. Let’s explore some using the ppsr::visualize_matrix() function.

datasets::trees has data on 31 trees’ girth, height and volume.

visualize_matrix(datasets::trees) shows that both girth and volume can be used to predict the other quite well, but not perfectly.

Let’s have a look at the correlation matrix.

The scores here seem quite higher in general. A near perfect correlation between volume and girth.

Is it near perfect though? Let’s have a look at the underlying data and fit a linear model to it.

You will still be pretty far off the real values when you use a linear model based on Girth to predict Volume. This is what the original PPS of 0.65 tried to convey.

Actually, I’ve run the math for this linaer model and the RMSE is still 4.11. Using just the mean Volume as a prediction of Volume will result in 16.17 RMSE. If we map these RMSE values on a linear scale from 0 to 1, we would get the PPS of our linear model, which is about 0.75.

So, actually, the linear model is a better predictor than the decision tree that is used as a default in the ppsr package. That was used to generate the PPS matrix above.

Yet, the linear model definitely does not provide a perfect prediction, even though the correlation may be near perfect.

Conclusion

In sum, I feel using the general idea behind PPS can be very useful for data exploration.

Particularly in more data science / machine learning type of projects. The PPS can provide a quick survey of which targets can be predicted using which features, potentially with more complex than just linear patterns.

Yet, the old-school correlation matrix also still provides unique and valuable insights that the PPS matrix does not. So I do not consider the PPS so much an alternative, as much as a complement in the toolkit of the data scientist & researcher.

Enjoy the R package, or the Python module for that matter, and let me know if you see any improvements!

Google’s Responsible AI Practices

Google’s Responsible AI Practices

As a company that uses a lot of automation, optimization, and machine learning in their day-to-day business, Google is set on developing AI in a socially responsible way.

Fortunately for us, Google decided to share their principles and best practices for us to read.

Google’s Objectives for AI applications

The details behind the seven objectives below you can find here.

  1. Be socially beneficial.
  2. Avoid creating or reinforcing unfair bias.
  3. Be built and tested for safety.
  4. Be accountable to people.
  5. Incorporate privacy design principles.
  6. Uphold high standards of scientific excellence.
  7. Be made available for uses that accord with these principles.

Moreover, there are several AI technologies that Google will not build:

Google’s best practices for Responsible AI

For the details behind these six best practices, read more here.

  1. Use a Human-centered approach (see also here)
  2. Identify multiple metrics to assess training and monitoring
  3. When possible, directly examine your raw data
  4. Understand the limitations of your dataset and model
  5. Test, Test, Test,
  6. Continue to monitor and update the system after deployment
Handling and Converting Data Types in Python Pandas

Handling and Converting Data Types in Python Pandas

Data types are one of those things that you don’t tend to care about until you get an error or some unexpected results. It is also one of the first things you should check once you load a new data into pandas for further analysis.

Chris Moffit

In this short tutorial, Chris shows how to the pandas dtypes map to the numpy and base Python data types.

A screenshot of the data type mapping.

Moreover, Chris demonstrates how to handle and convert data types so you can speed up your data analysis. Both using custom functions and anonymous lambda functions.

A snapshot from the original blog.

A very handy guide indeed, after which you will be able to read in your datasets into Python in the right format from the get-go!

Using data type casting, lambda functions, and functional programming to read in data in Python. Via pbpython.com/pandas_dtypes.html

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

Jon Schwabisch recently proposed ten guidelines for better table design.

Next to the academic paper, Jon shared his recommendations in a Twitter thread.

Let me summarize them for you:

  • Right-align your numbers
  • Left-align your texts
  • Use decimals appropriately (one or two is often enough)
  • Display units (e.g., $, %) sparsely (e.g., only on first row)
  • Highlight outliers
  • Highlight column headers
  • Use subtle highlights and dividers
  • Use white space between rows and columns
  • Use white space (or dividers) to highlight groups
  • Use visualizations for large tables
Afbeelding
Highlights in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290324966190338049/photo/2
Afbeelding
Visualizations in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325409570197509/photo/3
Afbeelding
Example of a well-organized table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325663543627784/photo/2