Tag: bestpractices

10 Tips for Effective Dashboard Design by Deloitte

10 Tips for Effective Dashboard Design by Deloitte

My colleague prof. Jack van Wijk pointed me towards these great guidelines by Deloitte on how to design an effective dashboard.

Some of these rules are more generally applicable to data visualization. Yet, the Deloitte 10 commandments form a good checklist when designing a dashboard.

Here’s my interpretation of the 10 rules:

  1. Know your message or goal
  2. Choose the chart that conveys your message best
  3. Use a grid to bring order to your dashboard
  4. Use color only to highlight and draw attention
  5. Remove unneccessary elements
  6. Avoid information overload
  7. Design for ease of use
  8. Text is as important as charts
  9. Design for multiple devices (desktop, tablet, mobile, …)
  10. Recycle good designs (by others)

In terms of recycling the good work by others operating in the data visualization field, check out:

I just love how Deloitte uses example visualizations to help convey what makes a good (dashboard) chart:

Screenshot from the Deloitte slidedeck
Screenshot from the Deloitte slidedeck
10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

Jon Schwabisch recently proposed ten guidelines for better table design.

Next to the academic paper, Jon shared his recommendations in a Twitter thread.

Let me summarize them for you:

  • Right-align your numbers
  • Left-align your texts
  • Use decimals appropriately (one or two is often enough)
  • Display units (e.g., $, %) sparsely (e.g., only on first row)
  • Highlight outliers
  • Highlight column headers
  • Use subtle highlights and dividers
  • Use white space between rows and columns
  • Use white space (or dividers) to highlight groups
  • Use visualizations for large tables
Afbeelding
Highlights in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290324966190338049/photo/2
Afbeelding
Visualizations in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325409570197509/photo/3
Afbeelding
Example of a well-organized table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325663543627784/photo/2
The 10 Fundamental Concepts of JavaScript

The 10 Fundamental Concepts of JavaScript

Another pearl of a resource on Twitter is this thread by Madison on 10 of fundamentalal concepts of Javascript — and programming in general for that matter.

For your convience, I copied the links below. Just click them to browse to the resource and learn more about the concept

Click to learn more about each concept

  1. Variables & Scoping
  2. Data types
  3. Objects, Funtions & Arrays
  4. Document Object Model (DOM)
  5. Prototypes & this.
  6. Events
  7. Flow Control (specifically, for-loops)
  8. Security & (web) Accesibility
  9. Good coding practices (to which I’ve linked before)
  10. Async

This 10-step list was compiled as apart of this interesting podcast, which I recommend you listen to as well.

Want to learn more?

According to many, this is the best book to continue learning more about JavaScript.

There’s a (now classic) conference talk that comes with this book, which I can also recommend you watch:

ML Model Degradation, and why work only just starts when you reach production

ML Model Degradation, and why work only just starts when you reach production

The assumption that a Machine Learning (ML) project is done when a trained model is put into production is quite faulty. Neverthless, according to Alexandre Gonfalonieri — artificial intelligence (AI) strategist at Philips — this assumption is among the most common mistakes of companies taking their AI products to market.

Actually, in the real world, we see pretty much the opposite of this assumption. People like Alexandre therefore strongly recommend companies keep their best data scientists and engineers on a ML project, especially after it reaches production!

Why?

If you’ve ever productionized a model and really started using it, you know that, over time, your model will start performing worse.

In order to maintain the original accuracy of a ML model which is interacting with real world customers or processes, you will need to continuously monitor and/or tweak it!

In the best case, algorithms are retrained with each new data delivery. This offers a maintenance burden that is not fully automatable. According to Alexandre, tending to machine learning models demands the close scrutiny, critical thinking, and manual effort that only highly trained data scientists can provide.

This means that there’s a higher marginal cost to operating ML products compared to traditional software. Whereas the whole reason we are implementing these products is often to decrease (the) costs (of human labor)!

What causes this?

Your models’ accuracy will often be at its best when it just leaves the training grounds.

Building a model on relevant and available data and coming up with accurate predictions is a great start. However, for how long do you expect those data — that age by the day — continue to provide accurate predictions?

Chances are that each day, the model’s latent performance will go down.

This phenomenon is called concept drift, and is heavily studied in academia but less often considered in business settings. Concept drift means that the statistical properties of the target variable, which the model is trying to predict, change over time in unforeseen ways.

In simpler terms, your model is no longer modelling the outcome that it used to model. This causes problems because the predictions become less accurate as time passes.

Particularly, models of human behavior seem to suffer from this pitfall.

The key is that, unlike a simple calculator, your ML model interacts with the real world. And the data it generates and that reaches it is going to change over time. A key part of any ML project should be predicting how your data is going to change over time.

Read more about concept drift here.

Via

How do we know when our models fail?

You need to create a monitoring strategy before reaching production!

According to Alexandre, as soon as you feel confident with your project after the proof-of-concept stage, you should start planning a strategy for keeping your models up to date.

How often will you check in?

On the whole model, or just some features?

What features?

In general, sensible model surveillance combined with a well thought out schedule of model checks is crucial to keeping a production model accurate. Prioritizing checks on the key variables and setting up warnings for when a change has taken place will ensure that you are never caught by a surprise by a change to the environment that robs your model of its efficacy.

Alexandre via

Your strategy will strongly differ based on your model and your business context.

Moreover, there are many different types of concept drift that can affect your models, so it should be a key element to think of the right strategy for you specific case!

Image result for concept drift
Different types of model drift (via)

Let’s solve it!

Once you observe degraded model performance, you will need to redesign your model (pipeline).

One solution is referred to as manual learning. Here, we provide the newly gathered data to our model and re-train and re-deploy it just like the first time we build the model. If you think this sounds time-consuming, you are right. Moreover, the tricky part is not refreshing and retraining a model, but rather thinking of new features that might deal with the concept drift.

A second solution could be to weight your data. Some algorithms allow for this very easily. For others you will need to custom build it in yourself. One recommended weighting schema is to use the inversely proportional age of the data. This way, more attention will be paid to the most recent data (higher weight) and less attention to the oldest of data (smaller weight) in your training set. In this sense, if there is drift, your model will pick it up and correct accordingly.

According to Alexandre and many others, the third and best solution is to build your productionized system in such a way that you continuously evaluate and retrain your models. The benefit of such a continuous learning system is that it can be automated to a large extent, thus reducing (the human labor) maintance costs.

Although Alexandre doesn’t expand on how to do these, he does formulate the three steps below:

Via the original blog

In my personal experience, if you have your model retrained (automatically) every now and then, using a smart weighting schema, and keep monitoring the changes in the parameters and for several “unit-test” cases, you will come a long way.

If you’re feeling more adventureous, you could improve on matters by having your model perform some exploration (at random or rule-wise) of potential new relationships in your data (see for instance multi-armed bandits). This will definitely take you a long way!

Solving concept drift (via)
Best practices for writing good, clean JavaScript code

Best practices for writing good, clean JavaScript code

Robert Martin’s book Clean Code has been on my to-read list for months now. Browsing the web, I stumbled across this repository of where Ryan McDermott applied the book’s principles to JavaScript. Basically, he made a guide to producing readable, reusable, and refactorable software code in JavaScript.

Although Ryan’s good and bad code examples are written in JavaScript, the basic principles (i.e. “Uncle Bob”‘s Clean Code principles) are applicable to any programming language. At least, I recognize many of the best practices I’d teach data science students in R or Python.

Find the JavaScript best practices github repo here: github.com/ryanmcdermott/clean-code-javascript

Knowing these won’t immediately make you a better software developer, and working with them for many years doesn’t mean you won’t make mistakes. Every piece of code starts as a first draft, like wet clay getting shaped into its final form. Finally, we chisel away the imperfections when we review it with our peers. Don’t beat yourself up for first drafts that need improvement. Beat up the code instead!

Ryan McDermott via clean-code-javascript

Screenshots from the repo:

Ryan McDermott’s github of clean JavaScript code
Ryan McDermott’s github of clean JavaScript code

Here are some of the principles listed, with hyperlinks:

But there are many, many more! Have a look at the original repo.

7 Reasons You Should Use Dot Graphs, by Maarten Lambrechts

7 Reasons You Should Use Dot Graphs, by Maarten Lambrechts

In my data visualization courses, I often refer to the hierarchy of visual encoding proposed by Cleveland and McGill. In their 1984 paper, Cleveland and McGill proposed the table below, demonstrating to what extent different visual encodings of data allow readers of data visualizations to accurately assess differences between data values.

DOI: 10.2307/2288400

Since then, this table has been used and copied by many data visualization experts, and adapted to more visually appealing layouts. Like this one by Alberto Cairo, referred to in a blog by Maarten Lambrechts:

cleveland_mcgill_cairo
Via http://www.thefunctionalart.com/

Now, this brings me to the point of this current blog, in which I want to share an older post by Maarten Lambrechts. I came across Maarten’s post only yesterday, but it touches on many topics and content that I’ve covered earlier on my own website or during my courses. It’s mainly about the relative effectiveness and efficiency of using dots/points in data visualizations.

Basically, dots are often the most accurate and to the point (pun intended). With the latter, I mean in terms of inkt used, dots/points are more efficient than bars, or as Maarten says:

Points go beyond where lines and bars stop. Sounds weird, especially for those who remember from their math classes that a line is an infinite collection of points. But in visualization, points can do so much more then lines. Here are seven reasons why you should use more dot graphs, with some examples.

http://www.maartenlambrechts.com/2015/05/03/to-the-point-7-reasons-you-should-use-dot-graphs.html

Maarten touches on the research of Cleveland and McGill, on a PLOS article advocating avoiding bars for continuous data, and on how to redesign charts to make use of more efficiënt dot/point encodings. I really loved this one redesign example Maarten shares. Unfortunately, it is in Dutch, but both graphs show pretty much the same data, though the simpler one better communicates the main message.

Do have a look at the rest of Maarten’s original blog post. I love how he ends it with some practical advice: A nice lookup table for those looking how to efficiently use points/dots to represent their n-dimensional data:

  • For comparisons of a single dimension across many categories: 1-dimensional scatterplot.
  • For detecting of skewed or bimodal distributions in 2 variables: connect 1-dimensional scatterplots (slopegraphs)
  • For showing relationships between 2 variables: 2-dimensional scatterplots.
  • For representing 4-dimensional data (3 numeric, 1 categorical or 4 numerical): bubble charts. Can also be used for 3 numerical dimensions or 2 numeric and 1 categorical value.
  • For representing 4-dimensional data +  time: animated bubble chart (aka Rosling-graph)