Tag: git

Automatically create perfect .gitignore file for your project

Automatically create perfect .gitignore file for your project

These days, I am often programming in multiple different languages for my projects. I will do some data generation and machine learning in Python. The data exploration and some quick visualizations I prefer to do in R. And if I’m feeling adventureous, I might add some Processing or JavaScript visualizations.

Obviously, I want to track and store the versions of my programs and the changes between them. I probably don’t have to tell you that git is the tool to do so.

Normally, you’d have a .gitignore file in your project folder, and all files that are not listed (or have patterns listed) in the .gitignore file are backed up online.

However, when you are working in multiple languages simulatenously, it can become a hassle to assure that only the relevant files for each language are committed to Github.

Each language will have their own “by-files”. R projects come with .Rdata, .Rproj, .Rhistory and so on, whereas Python projects generate pycaches and what not. These you don’t want to commit preferably.

Enter the stage, gitignore.io:

Here you simply enter the operating systems, IDEs, or Programming languages you are working with, and it will generate the appropriate .gitignore contents for you.

Let’s try it out

For my current project, I am working with Python and R in Visual Studio Code. So I enter:

And Voila, I get the perfect .gitignore including all specifics for these programs and languages:


# Created by https://www.gitignore.io/api/r,python,visualstudiocode
# Edit at https://www.gitignore.io/?templates=r,python,visualstudiocode

### Python ###
# Byte-compiled / optimized / DLL files
__pycache__/
*.py[cod]
*$py.class

# C extensions
*.so

# Distribution / packaging
.Python
build/
develop-eggs/
dist/
downloads/
eggs/
.eggs/
lib/
lib64/
parts/
sdist/
var/
wheels/
pip-wheel-metadata/
share/python-wheels/
*.egg-info/
.installed.cfg
*.egg
MANIFEST

# PyInstaller
#  Usually these files are written by a python script from a template
#  before PyInstaller builds the exe, so as to inject date/other infos into it.
*.manifest
*.spec

# Installer logs
pip-log.txt
pip-delete-this-directory.txt

# Unit test / coverage reports
htmlcov/
.tox/
.nox/
.coverage
.coverage.*
.cache
nosetests.xml
coverage.xml
*.cover
.hypothesis/
.pytest_cache/

# Translations
*.mo
*.pot

# Scrapy stuff:
.scrapy

# Sphinx documentation
docs/_build/

# PyBuilder
target/

# pyenv
.python-version

# pipenv
#   According to pypa/pipenv#598, it is recommended to include Pipfile.lock in version control.
#   However, in case of collaboration, if having platform-specific dependencies or dependencies
#   having no cross-platform support, pipenv may install dependencies that don't work, or not
#   install all needed dependencies.
#Pipfile.lock

# celery beat schedule file
celerybeat-schedule

# SageMath parsed files
*.sage.py

# Spyder project settings
.spyderproject
.spyproject

# Rope project settings
.ropeproject

# Mr Developer
.mr.developer.cfg
.project
.pydevproject

# mkdocs documentation
/site

# mypy
.mypy_cache/
.dmypy.json
dmypy.json

# Pyre type checker
.pyre/

### R ###
# History files
.Rhistory
.Rapp.history

# Session Data files
.RData
.RDataTmp

# User-specific files
.Ruserdata

# Example code in package build process
*-Ex.R

# Output files from R CMD build
/*.tar.gz

# Output files from R CMD check
/*.Rcheck/

# RStudio files
.Rproj.user/

# produced vignettes
vignettes/*.html
vignettes/*.pdf

# OAuth2 token, see https://github.com/hadley/httr/releases/tag/v0.3
.httr-oauth

# knitr and R markdown default cache directories
*_cache/
/cache/

# Temporary files created by R markdown
*.utf8.md
*.knit.md

### R.Bookdown Stack ###
# R package: bookdown caching files
/*_files/

### VisualStudioCode ###
.vscode/*
!.vscode/settings.json
!.vscode/tasks.json
!.vscode/launch.json
!.vscode/extensions.json

### VisualStudioCode Patch ###
# Ignore all local history of files
.history

# End of https://www.gitignore.io/api/r,python,visualstudiocode

Try it out yourself: http://gitignore.io/

How to Write a Git Commit Message, in 7 Steps

How to Write a Git Commit Message, in 7 Steps

Version control is an essential tool for any software developer. Hence, any respectable data scientist has to make sure his/her analysis programs and machine learning pipelines are reproducible and maintainable through version control.

Often, we use git for version control. If you don’t know what git is yet, I advise you begin here. If you work in R, start here and here. If you work in Python, start here.

This blog is intended for those already familiar working with git, but who want to learn how to write better, more informative git commit messages. Actually, this blog is just a summary fragment of this original blog by Chris Beams, which I thought deserved a wider audience.

Chris’ 7 rules of great Git commit messaging

  1. Separate subject from body with a blank line
  2. Limit the subject line to 50 characters
  3. Capitalize the subject line
  4. Do not end the subject line with a period
  5. Use the imperative mood in the subject line
  6. Wrap the body at 72 characters
  7. Use the body to explain what and why vs. how

For example:

Summarize changes in around 50 characters or less

More detailed explanatory text, if necessary. Wrap it to about 72
characters or so. In some contexts, the first line is treated as the
subject of the commit and the rest of the text as the body. The
blank line separating the summary from the body is critical (unless
you omit the body entirely); various tools like `log`, `shortlog`
and `rebase` can get confused if you run the two together.

Explain the problem that this commit is solving. Focus on why you
are making this change as opposed to how (the code explains that).
Are there side effects or other unintuitive consequences of this
change? Here's the place to explain them.

Further paragraphs come after blank lines.

 - Bullet points are okay, too

 - Typically a hyphen or asterisk is used for the bullet, preceded
   by a single space, with blank lines in between, but conventions
   vary here

If you use an issue tracker, put references to them at the bottom,
like this:

Resolves: #123
See also: #456, #789

If you’re having a hard time summarizing your commits in a single line or message, you might be committing too many changes at once. Instead, you should try to aim for what’s called atomic commits.

Cover image by XKCD#1296

Learn Programming Project-Based: Build-Your-Own-X

Learn Programming Project-Based: Build-Your-Own-X

Last week, this interesting reddit thread was filled with overviews for cool projects that may help you learn a programming language. The top entries are:

There’s a wide range of projects you can get started on building:

If you want to focus on building stuff in a specific programming language, you can follow these links:

If you’re really into C, then follow these links to build your own:

Learn Git Branching: An Interactive Tutorial

Learn Git Branching: An Interactive Tutorial

Peter Cottle built this great interactive Git tutorial that teaches you all vital branching skills right in your browser. It’s interactive, beautiful, and very informative, introducing every concept and Git command in a step-by-step fashion.

Have a look yourself: https://learngitbranching.js.org/

Here’s the associated GitHub repository for those interested in forking.

The tutorial includes many levels that progressively teach you the Git commands you’ll need to apply version control on a daily basis:

There’s also a sandbox mode where you can interactively explore and build your own Git tree.


LearnGitBranching is a git repository visualizer, sandbox, and a series of educational tutorials and challenges. Its primary purpose is to help developers understand git through the power of visualization (something that’s absent when working on the command line). This is achieved through a game with different levels to get acquainted with the different git commands.

You can input a variety of commands into LearnGitBranching (LGB) — as commands are processed, the nearby commit tree will dynamically update to reflect the effects of each command.

This visualization combined with tutorials and “levels” can help both beginners and intermediate developers polish their version control skills. A quick demo is available here: https://pcottle.github.com/learnGitBranching/?demo
Or, you can launch the application normally here: https://pcottle.github.com/learnGitBranching/

https://github.com/pcottle/learnGitBranching

GoalKicker: Free Programming Books

This specific link has been on my to-do list for so-long now that I’ve decided to just share it without any further ado.

The people behind GoalKicker, for whatever reason, decided to compile nearly 100 books on different programming languages based on among others StackOverflow entries. Their open access library contains books on languages from Latex to Linux, from Java to JavaScript, from SQL to MySQL, and from C, to C++, C#, and objective-C.

Basically, they host it all. Have a look yourself: https://books.goalkicker.com/