Tag: overview

OriginLab’s Graph Gallery: A blast from the past

OriginLab’s Graph Gallery: A blast from the past

Continuing my recent line of posts on data visualization resources, I found another repository in my inbox: OriginLab’s GraphGallery!

If I’m being honest, I would personally advice you to look at the dataviz project instead, if you haven’t heard of that one yet.

However, OriginLab might win in terms of sentiment. It has this nostalgic look of the ’90s, and apparently people really used it during that time. Nevertheless, despite looking old, the repo seems to be quite extensive, with nearly 400 different types of data visualizations:

Quantity isn’t everything though, as some of the 400 entries are disgustingly horrible:

There’s so much wrong with this graph…

What I do like about this OriginLab repo is that it has an option to sort its contents using a random order. This really facilitates discovery of new pearls:

Thanks to Maarten Lambrechts for sharing this resource on twitter a while back!

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

Last week I cohosted a professional learning course on data visualization at JADS. My fellow host was prof. Jack van Wijk, and together we organized an amazing workshop and poster event. Jack gave two lectures on data visualization theory and resources, and mentioned among others treevis.net, a resource I was unfamiliar with up until then.

treevis.net is a lot like the dataviz project in the sense that it is an extensive overview of different types of data visualizations. treevis is unique, however, in the sense that it is focused on specifically visualizations of hierarchical data: multi-level or nested data structures.

Hans-Jörg Schulz — professor of Computer Science at Aarhus University in Denmark — maintains the treevis repo. At the moment of writing, he has compiled over 300 different types of hierachical data visualizations and displays them on this website.

As an added bonus, the repo is interactive as there are several ways to filter and look for the visualization type that best fits your data and needs.

Most resources come with added links to the original authors and the original papers they were first published in, so this is truly a great resources for those interested in doing a deep dive into data visualization. Do have a look yourself!

Overview of built-in colors in R

Overview of built-in colors in R

Most of my data visualizations I create using R programming — as you might have noticed from the content of my website.

Though I am colorblind myself, I love to work with colors and color palettes in my visualizations. And I’ve come across quite some neat tricks in my time.

For instance, did you it’s super easy to create a reproducible though custom color palette? Or that there’s a quick reference card for ggplot2’s built-in colors? Or, and this is this blog post’s main subject, that you can access all built-in base colors using colors()!

This last trick, I learned in this recent blog post I came across, by Chisato. She explored all colors() base R incorporates, using the new ggforce and ggraph packages (thank you Thomas Lin Petersen!). Her exploration resulted in some nice visual overviews, which you can view in more detail in the original blog here.

Colors() with no color family
Colors() that have at least 5 colors in their family
Colors() with similar names

Data Visualization Tools & Resources

There’s this amazing overview of helpful dataviz resources atwww.visualisingdata.com/resources!

Browse through hundreds of helpful data visualization tools, programs, and services. All neatly organized by Andy Kirk in categories: data handling, applications, programming, web-based, qualitative, mapping, specialist, and colour. What a great repository!

A snapshot of www.visualisingdata.com/resource

Looking for expert books on data visualization?
Have a look at these recommendations!