Category: application

Try Hack Me – Cyber Security Challenges

Try Hack Me – Cyber Security Challenges

Sometimes I just stumble across these random resources that I immediately want to share with fellow geeks. If you like computers and programming, you should definitely have a look at…

https://tryhackme.com

TryHackMe started in 2018 by two cyber security enthusiasts, Ashu Savani and Ben Spring, who met at a summer internship. When getting started with in the field, they found learning security to be a fragmented, inaccessable and difficult experience; often being given a vulnerable machine’s IP with no additional resources is not the most efficient way to learn, especially when you don’t have any prior knowledge. When Ben returned back to University he created a way to deploy machines and sent it to Ashu, who suggested uploading all the notes they’d made over the summer onto a centralised platform for others to learn, for free.

To allow users to share their knowledge, TryHackMe allows other users (at no charge) to create a virtual room, which contains a combination of theoretical and practical learning components.. In early 2019, Jon Peters started creating rooms and suggested the platform build up a community, a task he took on and succeeded in.

The platform has never raised any capital and is entirely bootstrapped.

https://tryhackme.com/about

I don’t have any affiliation or whatever with the platform, but I just think it’s a super cool resource if you want to learn more about hands-on computer stuff.

Here’s a nice demo on an advanced programmer taking on one of the first challenges. I definitely still have a long way to go, but it’s fun to watch someone sneak into a (dummy) server and look for clues! Like a proper detective, but then an extra nerdy one!

There are many “hacktivities” you can try on the platform.

And if you’re serious about learning this stuff, there are learning paths set out for you!

If you like their content, do consider taking a paid subscription and share this great initiative!

How a File Format Exposed a Crossword Scandal

Vincent Warmerdam shared this Youtube video which I thoroughly enjoyed watched. It’s about Saul Pwanson, a software engineer whose hobby project got a little out of hand.

In 2016, Saul Pwanson designed a plain-text file format for crossword puzzle data, and then spent a couple of months building a micro-data-pipeline, scraping tens of thousands of crosswords from various sources.

After putting all these crosswords in a simple uniform format, Saul used some simple command line commands to check for common patterns and irregularities.

Surprisingly enough, after visualizing the results, Saul discovered egregious plagiarism by a major crossword editor that had gone on for years.

Ultimately, 538 even covered the scandal:

I thoroughly enjoyed watching this talk on Youtube.

Saul covers the file format, data pipeline, and the design choices that aided rapid exploration; the evidence for the scandal, from the initial anomalies to the final damning visualization; and what it’s like for a data project to get 15 minutes of fame.

I tried to localize the dataset online, but it seems Saul’s website has since gone offline. If you do happen to find it, please do share it in the comments!

Implementations of Trustworthy and Ethical AI (Report)

Implementations of Trustworthy and Ethical AI (Report)

Want to consider artificial intelligence applications and implementations from an ethical standpoint? Here’s a high-level conceptual view you might like:

Kolja Verhage wrote a report The Implementation of Trustworthy/Ethical AI in the US and Canada in cooperation with the Netherlands Innovation Attachรฉ Network. Based on numerous interviews with AI ethics experts, Kolja presents an overview of approaches and models on how to implement ethical AI.

For over 30 years there has been academic research on ethics and technology. Over the past five years, however, we’ve seen an acceleration in the impact of algorithms on society. This has led both companies
and governments across the world to think about how to govern these algorithms and control their impact on society. The first step of this has been for companies and governments to present abstract high-level principles of what they consider “Ethical AI”.

Kolja Verhage

You can access the report here.

nlintheusa.com/ethical-ai/
Practical Tools for Human-Centered Design

Practical Tools for Human-Centered Design

Google’s guidebook to human-centered AI design refered to the Design Kit, containing numerous helpful tools to help you design products with user experience in mind.

The design kit website contains many practical methods, tools, case studies and much more resources to help you in the design process.

Screenshot of designkit.org/methods

Human-centered design is a practical, repeatable approach to arriving at innovative solutions. Think of these Methods as a step-by-step guide to unleashing your creativity, putting the people you serve at the center of your design process to come up with new answers to difficult problems.

The design kit methods section provides some seriously handy guidelines to help you design your products with the customer in mind. A step-by-step process guideline is offered, as well as neat worksheets to records the information you collect in the process, and a video explanation of the method.

Example method screenshot from designkit.org/methods/frame-your-design-challenge
Google’s Guidebook for Developing AI Product Development

Google’s Guidebook for Developing AI Product Development

I came across another great set of curated resources by one of the teams at Google:

The People + AI Guidebook.

The People + AI Guidebook was written to help user experience (UX) professionals and product managers follow a human-centered approach to AI.

The Guidebookโ€™s recommendations are based on data and insights from over a hundred individuals across Google product teams, industry experts, and academic research.

These six chapters follow the product development flow, and each one has a related worksheet to help turn guidance into action.

The People & AI guidebook is one of the products of the major PAIR project team (People & AI Research).

Here are the direct links to the six guidebook chapters:

Links to the related worksheets you can find here.

Repository of Production Machine Learning

Repository of Production Machine Learning

The Institute for Ethical Machine Learning compiled this amazing curated list of open source libraries that will help you deploy, monitor, version, scale, and secure your production machine learning.

๐Ÿ” Explaining predictions & models๐Ÿ” Privacy preserving ML๐Ÿ“œ Model & data versioning
๐Ÿ Model Training Orchestration๐Ÿ’ช Model Serving and Monitoring๐Ÿค– Neural Architecture Search
๐Ÿ““ Reproducible Notebooks๐Ÿ“Š Visualisation frameworks๐Ÿ”  Industry-strength NLP
๐Ÿงต Data pipelines & ETL๐Ÿท๏ธ Data Labelling๐Ÿ—ž๏ธ Data storage
๐Ÿ“ก Functions as a service๐Ÿ—บ๏ธ Computation distribution๐Ÿ“ฅ Model serialisation
๐Ÿงฎ Optimized calculation frameworks๐Ÿ’ธ Data Stream Processing๐Ÿ”ด Outlier and Anomaly Detection
๐ŸŒ€ Feature engineering๐ŸŽ Feature Storesโš” Adversarial Robustness
๐Ÿ’ฐ Commercial Platforms
Direct links to the sections of the Github repo

The Institute for Ethical Machine Learning is a think-tank that brings together with technology leaders, policymakers & academics to develop standards for ML.