Tag: map

Xenographics: Unusual charts and maps

Xenographics: Unusual charts and maps

Xeno.graphics is the collection of unusual charts and maps Maarten Lambrechts maintains. It’s a repository of novel, innovative, and experimental visualizations to inspire you, to fight xenographphobia, and popularize new chart types.

For instance, have you ever before heard of a time curve? These are very useful to visualize the development of a relationship over time.

temp.JPG
Time curves are based on the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. [https://xeno.graphics/time-curve]
The upset plot is another example of an upcoming visualization. It can demonstrate the overlap or insection in a dataset. For instance, in the social network of #rstats twitter heroes, as the below example from the Xenographics website does.

temp.JPG
Understanding relationships between sets is an important analysis task. The major challenge in this context is the combinatorial explosion of the number of set intersections if the number of sets exceeds a trivial threshold. To address this, we introduce UpSet, a novel visualization technique for the quantitative analysis of sets, their intersections, and aggregates of intersections. [https://xeno.graphics/upset-plot/]
The below necklace map is new to me too. What it does precisely is unclear to me as well.

temp
In a necklace map, the regions of the underlying two-dimensional map are projected onto intervals on a one-dimensional curve (the necklace) that surrounds the map regions. Symbols are scaled such that their area corresponds to the data of their region and placed without overlap inside the corresponding interval on the necklace. [https://xeno.graphics/necklace-map/]
There are hundreds of other interestingcharts, maps, figures, and plots, so do have a look yourself. Moreover, the xenographics collection is still growing. If you know of one that isn’t here already, please submit it. You can also expect some posts about  certain topics around xenographics.

temp.JPG

Generating Book Covers By Their Words — My Dissertation Cover

Generating Book Covers By Their Words — My Dissertation Cover

As some of you might know, I am defending my PhD dissertation later this year. It’s titled “Data-Driven Human Resource Management: The rise of people analytics and its application to expatriate management” and, over the past few months, I was tasked with designing its cover.

Now, I didn’t want to buy some random stock photo depicting data, an organization, or overly happy employees. I’d rather build something myself. Something reflecting what I liked about the dissertation project: statistical programming and sharing and creating knowledge with others.

Hence, I came up with the idea to use the collective intelligence of the People Analytics community to generate a unique cover. It required a dataset of people analytics-related concepts, which I asked People Analytics professionals on LinkedIn, Twitter, and other channels to help compile. Via a Google Form, colleagues, connections, acquitances, and complete strangers contributed hundreds of keywords ranging from the standard (employees, HRM, performance) to the surprising (monetization, quantitative scissors [which I had to Google]). After reviewing the list and adding some concepts of my own creation, I ended up with 1786 unique words related to either business, HRM, expatriation, data science, or statistics.

I very much dislike wordclouds (these are kind of cool though), but already had a different idea in mind. I thought of generating a background cover of the words relating to my dissertation topic, over which I could then place my title and other information. I wanted to place these keywords randomly, maybe using a color schema, or with some random sizes.

The picture below shows the result of one of my first attempts. I programmed everything in R, writing some custom functionality to generate the word-datasets, the cover-plot, and .png, .pdf, and .gif files as output.

canvas.PNG

Random colors did not produce a pleasing result and I definitely needed more and larger words in order to fill my 17cm by 24cm canvas!

Hence, I started experimenting. Using base R’s expand.grid() and set.seed() together with mapply(), I could quickly explore and generate a large amount of covers based on different parameter settings and random fluctuations.

expand.grid(seed = c(1:3), 
            dupl = c(1:4, seq(5, 30, 5)),
            font = c("sans", "League Spartan"),
            colors = c(blue_scheme, red_scheme, 
                       rainbow_scheme, random_scheme),
            size_mult = seq(1, 3, 0.3),
            angle_sd = c(5, 10, 12, 15)) -> 
  param

mapply(create_textcover, 
       param$seed, param$dupl, 
       param$font, param$colors, 
       param$size_mult, param$angle_sd)

The generation process for each unique cover only took a few seconds, so I would generate a few hundred, quickly browse through them, update the parameters to match my preferences, and then generate a new set. Among others, I varied the color palette used, the size range of the words, their angle, the font used, et cetera. To fill up the canvas, I experimented with repeating the words: two, three, five, heck, even twenty, thirty times. After an evening of generating and rating, I came to the final settings for my cover:

  • Words were repeated twenty times in the dataset.
  • Words were randomly distributed across the canvas.
  • Words placed in random order onto the canvas, except for a select set of relevant words, placed last.
  • Words’ transparency ranged randomly between 0% and 70%.
  • Words’ color was randomly selected out of six colors from this palette of blues.
  • Words’ writing angles were normally distributed around 0 degrees, with a standard deviation of 12 degrees. However, 25% of words were explicitly without angle.
  • Words’ size ranged between 1 and 4 based on a negative binomial distribution (10 * 0.8) resulting in more small than large words. The set of relevant words were explicitly enlarged throughout.

With League Spartan (#thisisparta) loaded as a beautiful custom font, this was the final cover background which I and my significant other liked most:

cover_wordcloud_20-League Spartan-4.png

While I still need to decide on the final details regarding title placement and other details, I suspect that the final cover will look something like below — the white stripe in the middle depicting the book’s back.

coverpaul.png

Now, for the finale, I wanted to visualize the generation process via a GIF. Thomas Lin Pedersen developed this great gganimate package, which builds on the older animation package. The package greatly simplifies creating your own GIFs, as I already discussed in this earlier blog about animated GIFs in R. Anywhere, here is the generation process, where each frame includes the first frame ^ 3.2 words:

cover_wordcloud_20-League Spartan_4.gif

If you are interested in the process, or the R code I’ve written, feel free to reach out!

I’m sharing a digital version of the dissertation online sometime around the defense date: November 9th, 2018. If you’d like a copy, you can still leave your e-mailadress in the Google Form here and I’ll make sure you’ll receive your copy in time!