Learn Julia for Data Science

Most data scientists favor Python as a programming language these days. However, there’s also still a large group of data scientists coming from a statistics, econometrics, or social science and therefore favoring R, the programming language they learned in university. Now there’s a new kid on the block: Julia. Advantages & Disadvantages According to some,…

Learning Functional Programming & purrr

The R for Data Science (R4DS) book by Hadley Wickham is a definite must-read for every R programmer. Amongst others, the power of functional programming is explained in it very well in the chapter on Iteration. I wrote about functional programming before, but I recently re-read the R4DS book section after coming across some new valuable…

rstudio::conf 2018 summary

rstudio::conf is the yearly conference when it comes to R programming and RStudio. In 2017, nearly 500 people attended and, last week, 1100 people went to the 2018 edition. Regretfully, I was on holiday in Cardiff and missed out on meeting all my #rstats hero’s. Just browsing through the #rstudioconf Twitter-feed, I already learned so many new things…

Improved Twitter Mining in R

R users have been using the twitter package by Geoff Jentry to mine tweets for several years now. However, a recent blog suggests a novel package provides a better mining tool: rtweet by Michael Kearney (GitHub). Both packages use a similar setup and require you to do some prep-work by creating a Twitter “app” (see the package instructions). However, rtweet will save…

Predict the Sentimental Response to your Facebook Posts

Max Woolf writes machine learning blogs on his personal blog, minimaxir, and posts open-source code repositories on his GitHub. He is a former Apple Software QA Engineer and graduated from Carnegie Mellon University. I have published his work before, for instance, this short ggplot2 tutorial by MiniMaxir, but his new project really amazed me. Max developed a Facebook web scaper in…