Papers with Code: State-of-the-Art

OK, this is a really great find! The website PapersWithCode.com lists all scientific publications of which the codes are open-sourced on GitHub. Moreover, you can sort these papers by the stars they accumulated on Github over the past days. The authors, @rbstojnic and @rosstaylor90, just made this in their spare time. Thank you, sirs! Papers with Code allows you to quickly…

Sentiment Analysis: Analyzing Lexicon Quality and Estimation Errors

Sentiment analysis is a topic I cover regularly, for instance, with regard to Harry Plotter, Stranger Things, or Facebook. Usually I stick to the three sentiment dictionaries (i.e., lexicons) included in the tidytext R package (Bing, NRC, and AFINN) but there are many more one could use. Heck, I’ve even tried building one myself using a synonym/antonym…

Sentiment Analysis of Stranger Things Seasons 1 and 2

Jordan Dworkin, a Biostatistics PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania, is one of the few million fans of Stranger Things, a 80s-themed Netflix series combining drama, fantasy, mystery, and horror. Awaiting the third season, Jordan was curious as to the emotional voyage viewers went through during the series, and he decided to examine this…

Text Mining: Pythonic Heavy Metal

This blog summarized work that has been posted here, here, and here. Iain of degeneratestate.org wrote a three-piece series where he applied text mining to the lyrics of 222,623 songs from 7,364 heavy metal bands spread over 22,314 albums that he scraped from darklyrics.com. He applied a broad range of different analyses in Python, the code of which…

Harry Plotter: Part 2 – Hogwarts Houses and their Stereotypes

Two weeks ago, I started the Harry Plotter project to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the first Harry Potter book. I could not have imagined that the first blog would be so well received. It reached over 4000 views in a matter of days thanks to the lovely people in the data science and #rstats community that were kind enough to share it…

Predict the Sentimental Response to your Facebook Posts

Max Woolf writes machine learning blogs on his personal blog, minimaxir, and posts open-source code repositories on his GitHub. He is a former Apple Software QA Engineer and graduated from Carnegie Mellon University. I have published his work before, for instance, this short ggplot2 tutorial by MiniMaxir, but his new project really amazed me. Max developed a Facebook web scaper in…

Variance Explained: Text Mining Trump’s Twitter – Part 2

Reposted from Variance Explained with minor modifications. This post follows an earlier post on the same topic. A year ago today, I wrote up a blog post Text analysis of Trump’s tweets confirms he writes only the (angrier) Android half. My analysis, shown below, concludes that the Android and iPhone tweets are clearly from different people, posting…

Harry Plotter: Celebrating the 20 year anniversary with tidytext and the tidyverse in R

It has been twenty years since the first Harry Potter novel, the sorcerer’s/philosopher’s stone, was published. To honour the series, I started a text analysis and visualization project, which my other-half wittily dubbed Harry Plotter. In several blogs, I intend to demonstrate how Hadley Wickham’s tidyverse and packages that build on its principles, such as tidytext (free book), have taken programming in R to an…