Tag: professional

How to Speak – MIT lecture by Patrick Winston

How to Speak – MIT lecture by Patrick Winston

Patrick Winston was a professor of Artificial Intelligence at MIT. Having taught with great enthusiasm for over 50 years, he passed away past June.

As a speaker [Patrick] always had his audience in the palm of his hand. He put a tremendous amount of work into his lectures, and yet managed to make them feel loose and spontaneous. He wasn’t flashy, but he was compelling and direct.

Peter Szolovits via http://news.mit.edu/2019/patrick-winston-professor-obituary-0719

I’ve written about Patrick’s MIT course on Artificial Intelligence before, as all 20+ lectures have been shared open access online on Youtube. I’ve worked through the whole course in 2017/2018, and it provided me many new insights into the inner workings of common machine learning algorithms.

Now, I stumbled upon another legacy of Patrick that has been opened up as of December 20th 2019. A lecture on “How to Speak” – where Patrick explains what he think makes a talk enticing, inspirational, and interesting.

Patrick Winston’s How to Speak talk has been an MIT tradition for over 40 years. Offered every January, the talk is intended to improve your speaking ability in critical situations by teaching you a few heuristic rules.

https://ocw.mit.edu/resources/res-tll-005-how-to-speak-january-iap-2018/

That’s all I’m going to say about it, you should have a look yourself! If you don’t apply these techniques yet, do try them out, they will really upgrade your public speaking effectiveness:

Learn from the Pros: How media companies visualize data

Learn from the Pros: How media companies visualize data

Past months, multiple companies shared their approaches to data visualization and their lessons learned.

Click the companies in the list below to jump to their respective section


Financial Times

The Financial Times (FT) released a searchable database of the many data visualizations they produced over the years. Some lovely examples include:

Graphic showing what May needs to happen to get her deal over the line when MPs vote on Friday
Data visualization belonging to a recent Brexit piece by the FT, viahttps://www.ft.com/graphics
Dutch housing graphic
Searching the FT database for European House Prices via https://www.ft.com/graphics returns this map of the Netherlands.

BBC

The BBC released a free cookbook for data visualization using R programming. Here is the associated Medium post announcing the book.

The BBC data team developed an R package (bbplot) which makes the process of creating publication-ready graphics in their in-house style using R’s ggplot2 library a more reproducible process, as well as making it easier for people new to R to create graphics.

Apart from sharing several best practices related to data visualization, they walk you through the steps and R code to create graphs such as the below:

One of the graphs the BBC cookbook will help you create, via https://bbc.github.io/rcookbook/

Economist

The data team at the Economist also felt a need to share their lessons learned via Medium. They show some of their most misleading, confusing, and failing graphics of the past years, and share the following mistakes and their remedies:

  • Truncating the scale (image #1 below)
  • Forcing a relationship by cherry-picking scales
  • Choosing the wrong visualisation method (image #2 below)
  • Taking the “mind-stretch” a little too far (image #3 below)
  • Confusing use of colour (image #4 below)
  • Including too much detail
  • Lots of data, not enough space

Moreover, they share the data behind these failing and repaired data visualizations:

Via https://medium.economist.com/mistakes-weve-drawn-a-few-8cdd8a42d368
Via https://medium.economist.com/mistakes-weve-drawn-a-few-8cdd8a42d368
Via https://medium.economist.com/mistakes-weve-drawn-a-few-8cdd8a42d368
Via https://medium.economist.com/mistakes-weve-drawn-a-few-8cdd8a42d368

FiveThirtyEight

I could not resist including this (older) overview of the 52 best charts FiveThirtyEight claimed they made.

All 538’s data visualizations are just stunningly beautiful and often very
ingenious, using new chart formats to display complex patterns. Moreover, the range of topics they cover is huge. Anything ranging from their traditional background — politics — to great cover stories on sumo wrestling and pricy wine.

Viahttps://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-52-best-and-weirdest-charts-we-made-in-2016/
Via https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-52-best-and-weirdest-charts-we-made-in-2016/ You should definitely check out the original cover story via https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/sumo/
Via https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-52-best-and-weirdest-charts-we-made-in-2016/

Books for the modern, data-driven HR professional (incl. People Analytics)

Books for the modern, data-driven HR professional (incl. People Analytics)

With great pleasure I’ve studied and worked in the field of people analytics, where we seek to leverage employee, management-, and business information to better organize and manage our personnel. Here, data has proven valuable itself indispensible for the organization of the future.

Data and analytics have not traditionally been high on the list of HR professionals. Fortunately, there is an increased awareness that the 21st century (HR) manager has to be data-savvy. But where to start learning? The plentiful available resources can be daunting…

Have a look at these 100+ amazing books
for (starting) people analytics specialists.
My personal recommendations are included as pictures,
but feel free to ask for more detailed suggestions!


Categories (clickable)

  • Behavioural Psychology: focus on behavioural psychology and economics, including decision-making and the biases therein.
  • Technology: focus on the implications of new technology….
    • Ethics: … on society and humanity, and what can go wrong.
    • Digital & Data-driven HR: … for the future of work, workforce, and organization. Includes people analytics case studies.
  • Management: focus on industrial and organizational psychology, HR, leadership, and business strategy.
  • Statistics: focus on the technical books explaining statistical concepts and applied data analysis.
    • People analytics: …. more technical books on how to conduct people analytics studies step-by-step in (statistical) software.
    • Programming: … technical books specifically aimed at (statistical) programming and data analysis.
  • Communication: focus on information exchange, presentation, and data visualization.

Disclaimer: This page contains links to Amazon’s book shop.
Any purchases through those links provide us with a small commission that helps to host this blog.

Behavioural Psychology books

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Technology books

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Ethics in Data & Machine Learning

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Digital & Data-driven HR

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Management books

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Statistics books

Applied People Analytics

Programming

You can find an overview of 20+ free programming books here.

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Data Visualization books

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A note of thanks

I want to thank the active people analytics community, publishing in management journals, but also on social media. I knew Littral Shemer Haim already hosted a people analytics reading list, and so did Analytics in HR (Erik van Vulpen) and Workplaceif (Manoj Kumar). After Jared Valdron called for book recommendation on people analytics on LinkedIn, and nearly 60 people replied, I thought let’s merge these overviews.

Hence, a big thank you and acknowledgement to all those who’ve contributed directly or indirectly. I hope this comprehensive merged overview is helpful.

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Predictive HR Analytics

Predictive HR Analytics

Tilburg University has set up a masterclass Predictive HR Analytics. In 3 days, the Professional Learning program will teach you all you need to know to implement predictive analytics and take HR to the next level. More information can be found here.

What makes this program unique?

  • The masterclass Predictive HR Analytics goes beyond HR analytics and focuses on transformational people predictions. You learn how to embed predictive HR analytics into your HR Strategy and how to use your findings to convince others.
  • The masterclass is developed at the prestigious Human Resources department at Tilburg University, which has obtained international recognition with its high-quality academic research in the HRM field.
  • The mix of professors in conjunction with leading HR professionals leads to a strong academic program with a practical approach.
  • Your peer participants will make sure that the class opens up a high-quality network of HR specialists. The diversity of leading companies from different sectors in the classroom creates new insights for all the participants.
  • The program is like a 3-day pressure cooker. By combining online and offline components, we can create more in-depth discussions in the classroom.
  • You will experience a high impact on your daily practice, since the program is focused on direct implementation.

Your profile

This course is ideal for anyone in HR seeking to become more adept in using quantitative data for decision making. Typical participants are (future) HR analysts, HR managers, HR business partners, HR consultants and (financial) business analysts with a strong link on people resources. Participants are from various sectors, such as financial services, healthcare institutions, government agencies and business services.