Tag: psychology

Free Springer Books during COVID19

Free Springer Books during COVID19

Book publisher Springer just released over 400 book titles that can be downloaded free of charge following the corona-virus outbreak.

Here’s fhe full overview: https://link.springer.com/search?facet-content-type=%22Book%22&package=mat-covid19_textbooks&facet-language=%22En%22&sortOrder=newestFirst&showAll=true

Most of these books will normally set you back about $50 to $150, so this is a great deal!

There are many titles on computer science, programming, business, psychology, and here are some specific titles that might interest my readership:

Note that I only got to page 8 of 21, so there are many more free interesting titles out there!

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The Mental Game of Python, by Raymond Hettinger

The Mental Game of Python, by Raymond Hettinger

YouTube recommended I’d watch this recorded presentation by Raymond Hettinger at PyBay2019 last October. Quite a long presentation for what I’d normally watch, but what an eye-openers it contains!

Raymond Hettinger is a Python core developer and in this video he presents 10 programming strategies in these 60 minutes, all using live examples. Some are quite obvious, but the presentation and examples make them very clear. Raymond presents some serious programming truths, and I think they’ll stick.

First, Raymond discusses chunking and aliasing. He brings up the theory that the human mind can only handle/remember 7 pieces of information at a time, give or take 2. Anything above proves to much cognitive load, and causes discomfort as well as errors. Hence, in a programming context, we need to make sure programmers can use all 7 to improve the code, rather than having to decypher what’s in front of them. In a programming context, we do so by modularizing and standardizing through functions, modules, and packages. Raymond uses the Python random module to hightlight the importance of chunking and modular code. This part was quite long, but still interesting.

For the next two strategies, Raymond quotes the Feinmann method of solving problems: “(1) write down a clear problem specification; (2) think very, very hard; (3) write down a solution”. Using the example of a tree walker, Raymond shows how the strategies of incremental development and solving simpler programs can help you build programs that solve complex problems. This part only lasts a couple of minutes but really underlines the immense value of these strategies.

Next, Raymond touches on the DRY principle: Don’t Repeat Yourself. But in a context I haven’t seen it in yet, object oriented programming [OOP], classes, and inherintance.

Raymond continues to build his arsenal of programming strategies in the next 10 minutes, where he argues that programmers should repeat tasks manually until patterns emerge, before they starting moving code into functions. Even though I might not fully agree with him here, he does have some fun examples of file conversion that speak in his case.

Lastly, Raymond uses the graph below to make the case that OOP is a graph traversal problem. According to Raymond, the Python ecosystem is so rich that there’s often no need to make new classes. You can simply look at the graph below. Look for the island you are currently on, check which island you need to get to, and just use the methods that are available, or write some new ones.

While there were several more strategies that Raymond wanted to discuss, he doesn’t make it to the end of his list of strategies as he spend to much time on the first, chunking bit. Super curious as to the rest? Contact Raymond on Twitter.

People Analytics: Is nudging goed werkgeverschap of onethisch?

People Analytics: Is nudging goed werkgeverschap of onethisch?

In Dutch only:

Voor Privacyweb schreef ik onlangs over people analytics en het mogelijk resulterende nudgen van medewerkers: kleine aanpassingen of duwtjes die mensen in de goede richting zouden moeten sturen. Medewerkers verleiden tot goed gedrag, als het ware. Maar wie bepaalt dan wat goed is, en wanneer zouden werkgevers wel of niet mogen of zelfs moeten nudgen?

Lees het volledige artikel hier.

Books for the modern, data-driven HR professional (incl. People Analytics)

Books for the modern, data-driven HR professional (incl. People Analytics)

With great pleasure I’ve studied and worked in the field of people analytics, where we seek to leverage employee, management-, and business information to better organize and manage our personnel. Here, data has proven valuable itself indispensible for the organization of the future.

Data and analytics have not traditionally been high on the list of HR professionals. Fortunately, there is an increased awareness that the 21st century (HR) manager has to be data-savvy. But where to start learning? The plentiful available resources can be daunting…

Have a look at these 100+ amazing books
for (starting) people analytics specialists.
My personal recommendations are included as pictures,
but feel free to ask for more detailed suggestions!


Categories (clickable)

  • Behavioural Psychology: focus on behavioural psychology and economics, including decision-making and the biases therein.
  • Technology: focus on the implications of new technology….
    • Ethics: … on society and humanity, and what can go wrong.
    • Digital & Data-driven HR: … for the future of work, workforce, and organization. Includes people analytics case studies.
  • Management: focus on industrial and organizational psychology, HR, leadership, and business strategy.
  • Statistics: focus on the technical books explaining statistical concepts and applied data analysis.
    • People analytics: …. more technical books on how to conduct people analytics studies step-by-step in (statistical) software.
    • Programming: … technical books specifically aimed at (statistical) programming and data analysis.
  • Communication: focus on information exchange, presentation, and data visualization.

Disclaimer: This page contains links to Amazon’s book shop.
Any purchases through those links provide us with a small commission that helps to host this blog.

Behavioural Psychology books

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Technology books

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Ethics in Data & Machine Learning

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Digital & Data-driven HR

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Management books

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Statistics books

Applied People Analytics

Programming

You can find an overview of 20+ free programming books here.

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Data Visualization books

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A note of thanks

I want to thank the active people analytics community, publishing in management journals, but also on social media. I knew Littral Shemer Haim already hosted a people analytics reading list, and so did Analytics in HR (Erik van Vulpen) and Workplaceif (Manoj Kumar). After Jared Valdron called for book recommendation on people analytics on LinkedIn, and nearly 60 people replied, I thought let’s merge these overviews.

Hence, a big thank you and acknowledgement to all those who’ve contributed directly or indirectly. I hope this comprehensive merged overview is helpful.

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EAWOP 2017 – Takeaways

Past week, I attended the 2017 conference of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP), which was hosted by University College Dublin. There were many interesting sessions, the venue was amazing, and Dublin is a lovely city.  Personally, I mostly enjoyed the presentations on selection and assessment test validity, and below are my main takeaways:

  • circumplexProfessor Stephen Woods gave a most interesting presentation on the development of a periodic table of personality. The related 2016 JAP article you can find here. Woods compares the most commonly used personality indices, “plotting” each scale on a two-dimensional circumplex of the most strongly related Big-Five OCEAN scales. This creates a structure that closely resembles a periodic table, with which he demonstrates which elements of personality are well-researched and which require more scholarly attention. In the presentation, Woods furthermore reviewed the relationship of several of these elements and their effect on job-related outcomes. You can find the abstracts of the larger personality & analytics symposium here.
  • One of the symposia focused on social desirability, impression management, and faking behaviors in personality measurement. The first presentation by Patrick Dunlop elaborated on the various ways in which to measure faking, such as with bogus items, social desirability scales, or by measuring blatant extreme responses. Dunlop’s exemplary study on repeat applicants to firefighter positions was highly amusing. Second, Nicolas Roulin demonstrated how the perceived competitive climate in organizations can cause applicants to positively inflate most of their personality scores, with the exception of their self-reported Extraversion and Conscientiousness which seemed quite stable no matter the perceived competitiveness. Third, Pelt (Ph.D. at Erasmus University and IXLY) demonstrated how (after some statistical corrections) the level of social desirability in personality tests can be reduced by using forced-choice instead of Likert scales. If practitioners catch on, this will likely become the new status quo. The fourth presentation was also highly relevant, proposing to use items that are less biased in their formulation towards specific personality traits (Extraversion is often promoted whereas items on Introversion inherently have negative connotations (e.g., “shyness”)). Fifth and most interestingly, Van der Linden (also Erasmus) showed how a higher-order factor analysis on the Big-Five OCEAN scales results in a single factor of personality – commonly referred to as the Big-One or the general factor of personality. This one factor could represent some sort of social desirability, but according to meta-analytical results presented by van der Linden, the factor correlates .88 with emotional intelligence! Moreover, it consistently predicts performance behaviors (also as rated by supervisors or in 360 assessments) better than the Big-Five factors separately, with only Conscientiousness retaining some incremental validity. You can find the abstracts and the author details of the symposium here.

socialdesirability

  • Schäpers (Free University Berlin) demonstrates with three independent experiments that the situational or contextual prompts in a situational judgment test (SJT) do not matter for its validity. In other words, excluding the work-related critical incidents before the item did not affect the predictive validity: not for general mental ability, personality dimensions, emotional intelligence, nor job performance. Actually, the validity improved a little for certain outcomes. These results suggest that SJTs may measure something completely different from what is previously posed. Schäpers found similar effects for written and video-based SJTs. The abstract of Schäpers’ paper can be found here.
  • Finally, assessment vendor cut-e was the main sponsor of the conference. They presented among others their new tool chatAssess, which brings SJTs to a mobile environment. Via this link (https://maptq.com/default/home/nl/start/2tkxsmdi) you can run a demo using the password demochatassess. The abstract of this larger session on game-based assessment can be found here.

csm_chatassess-screens_14e4fee553

The rest of the 2017 EAWOP program can be viewed here.