Category: visualization

Select the right data visualization or chart type

Select the right data visualization or chart type

I found this amazing website data-to-viz.com that helps you select the right data visualization or chart type for your data.

Got numeric data? Two variables? No inherent order? Just a few data points? Pick a boxplot, histogram, or scatterplot!

Categorical data? There’s a seperate decision tree for those!

There’s a whole world of possible chart types you can choose from. The website explains you how they work and when to use which type.

The website also warns you for some common mistakes in data visualization.

The cover image is a poster you can buy to support the authors of data-viz.com!

10 Tips for Effective Dashboard Design by Deloitte

10 Tips for Effective Dashboard Design by Deloitte

My colleague prof. Jack van Wijk pointed me towards these great guidelines by Deloitte on how to design an effective dashboard.

Some of these rules are more generally applicable to data visualization. Yet, the Deloitte 10 commandments form a good checklist when designing a dashboard.

Here’s my interpretation of the 10 rules:

  1. Know your message or goal
  2. Choose the chart that conveys your message best
  3. Use a grid to bring order to your dashboard
  4. Use color only to highlight and draw attention
  5. Remove unneccessary elements
  6. Avoid information overload
  7. Design for ease of use
  8. Text is as important as charts
  9. Design for multiple devices (desktop, tablet, mobile, …)
  10. Recycle good designs (by others)

In terms of recycling the good work by others operating in the data visualization field, check out:

I just love how Deloitte uses example visualizations to help convey what makes a good (dashboard) chart:

Screenshot from the Deloitte slidedeck
Screenshot from the Deloitte slidedeck
10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

10 Guidelines to Better Table Design

Jon Schwabisch recently proposed ten guidelines for better table design.

Next to the academic paper, Jon shared his recommendations in a Twitter thread.

Let me summarize them for you:

  • Right-align your numbers
  • Left-align your texts
  • Use decimals appropriately (one or two is often enough)
  • Display units (e.g., $, %) sparsely (e.g., only on first row)
  • Highlight outliers
  • Highlight column headers
  • Use subtle highlights and dividers
  • Use white space between rows and columns
  • Use white space (or dividers) to highlight groups
  • Use visualizations for large tables
Afbeelding
Highlights in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290324966190338049/photo/2
Afbeelding
Visualizations in a table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325409570197509/photo/3
Afbeelding
Example of a well-organized table. Via twitter.com/jschwabish/status/1290325663543627784/photo/2
How most statistical tests are linear models

How most statistical tests are linear models

Jonas Kristoffer Lindeløv wrote a great visual explanation of how the most common statistical tests (t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, etc) are all linear models in the back-end.

Jonas’ original blog uses R programming to visually show how the tests work, what the linear models look like, and how different approaches result in the same statistics.

George Ho later remade a Python programming version of the same visual explanation.

If I was thought statistics and methodology this way, I sure would have struggled less! Have a look yourself: https://lindeloev.github.io/tests-as-linear/

Visualizing and interpreting Cohen’s d effect sizes

Visualizing and interpreting Cohen’s d effect sizes

Cohen’s d (wiki) is a statistic used to indicate the standardised difference between two means. Resarchers often use it to compare the averages between groups, for instance to determine that there are higher outcomes values in a experimental group than in a control group.

Researchers often use general guidelines to determine the size of an effect. Looking at Cohen’s d, psychologists often consider effects to be small when Cohen’s d is between 0.2 or 0.3, medium effects (whatever that may mean) are assumed for values around 0.5, and values of Cohen’s d larger than 0.8 would depict large effects (e.g., University of Bath).

The two groups’ distributions belonging to small, medium, and large effects visualized

Kristoffer Magnusson hosts this Cohen’s d effect size comparison tool on his website the R Psychologist, but recently updated the visualization and its interactivity. And the tool looks better than ever:

Moreover, Kristoffer adds some nice explanatons of the numbers and their interpretation in real life situations:

If you find the tool useful, please consider buying Kristoffer a coffee or buying one of his beautiful posters, like the one above, or below:

Frequentisme betekenis testen poster horizontaal image 0

By the way, Kristoffer hosts many other interesting visualization tools (most made with JavaScript’s D3 library) on statistics and statistical phenomena on his website, have a look!

Generative art: Let your computer design you a painting

Generative art: Let your computer design you a painting

I really like generative art, or so-called algorithmic art. Basically, it means you take a pattern or a complex system of rules, and apply it to create something new following those patterns/rules.

When I finished my PhD, I got a beautiful poster of where the k-nearest neighbors algorithms was used to generate a set of connected points.

Marcus Volz’ nearest neighbors graph, via https://marcusvolz.com/#nearest-neighbour-graph

My first piece of generative art.

As we recently moved into our new house, I decided I wanted to have a brother for the knn-poster. So I did some research in algorithms I wanted to use to generate a painting. I found some very cool ones, of which I unforunately can’t recollect the artists anymore:

However, I preferred to make one myself. So we again turned to the work of the author that made the knn-poster: Marcus Volz.

He has written (in R) many other algorithms. And we found that one specifically nicely matched the knn-poster. His metropolis – or generative city:

Marcus’ generative city, via https://marcusvolz.com/#generative-city

However, I wanted to make one myself, so I download Marcus code, and tweaked it a bit. Most importantly, I made it start in the center, made it fill up the whole space, and I made it run more efficient so I could generate a couple dozen large cities quickly, and pick the one I liked most. Here’s the end result:

And in action, in my living room: