Animated Machine Learning Classifiers

Ryan Holbrook made awesome animated GIFs in R of several classifiers learning a decision rule boundary between two classes. Basically, what you see is a machine learning model in action, learning how to distinguish data of two classes, say cats and dogs, using some X and Y variables. These visuals can be great to understand…

Leonardo: Adaptive Color Palettes using Contrast-Ratio

Leonardo is an open source tool for creating adaptive color palettes; a custom color generator for creating colors based on target contrast ratio. Leonardo is delivered as a Javascript module (@adobe/leonardo-contrast-colors) with a web interface to aid in creating your color palette configurations, which can easily be shared with both designers and engineers. Simply put, Leonardo…

Top-19 articles of 2019

With only one day remaining in 2019, let’s review the year. 2019 was my third year of blogging and it went by even quicker than the previous two! Personally, it has been a busy year for me: I started a new job, increased my speaking and teaching activities, bought and moved to my new house,…

Turning the Traveling Salesman problem into Art

Robert Bosch is a professor of Natural Science at the department of Mathematics of Oberlin College and has found a creative way to elevate the travelling salesman problem to an art form. For those who aren’t familiar with the travelling salesman problem (wiki), it is a classic algorithmic problem in the field of computer science and operations research….

OriginLab's Graph Gallery: A blast from the past

Continuing my recent line of posts on data visualization resources, I found another repository in my inbox: OriginLab’s GraphGallery! If I’m being honest, I would personally advice you to look at the dataviz project instead, if you haven’t heard of that one yet. However, OriginLab might win in terms of sentiment. It has this nostalgic…

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

Last week I cohosted a professional learning course on data visualization at JADS. My fellow host was prof. Jack van Wijk, and together we organized an amazing workshop and poster event. Jack gave two lectures on data visualization theory and resources, and mentioned among others treevis.net, a resource I was unfamiliar with up until then….

7 Reasons You Should Use Dot Graphs, by Maarten Lambrechts

In my data visualization courses, I often refer to the hierarchy of visual encoding proposed by Cleveland and McGill. In their 1984 paper, Cleveland and McGill proposed the table below, demonstrating to what extent different visual encodings of data allow readers of data visualizations to accurately assess differences between data values. Since then, this table…

A Visual Introduction to Hierarchical Models, by Michael Freeman

Hierarchical models I have covered before on this blog. These models are super relevant in practice. For instance, in HR, employee data is always nested within teams which are in turn nested within organizational units. Also in my current field of insurances, claims are always nested within policies, which can in turn be nested within…