How to Read Scientific Papers

Cover image via wikihow.com/Read-a-Scientific-Paper Reddit is a treasure trove of random stuff. However, every now and then, in the better groups, quite valuable topics pop up. Here’s one I came across on r/statistics: Particularly the advice by grandzooby seemed worth a like, and he linked to several useful resources which I’ve summarized for you below….

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

Last week I cohosted a professional learning course on data visualization at JADS. My fellow host was prof. Jack van Wijk, and together we organized an amazing workshop and poster event. Jack gave two lectures on data visualization theory and resources, and mentioned among others treevis.net, a resource I was unfamiliar with up until then….

Anomaly Detection Resources

Carnegie Mellon PhD student Yue Zhao collects this great Github repository of anomaly detection resources: https://github.com/yzhao062/anomaly-detection-resources The repository consists of tools for multiple languages (R, Python, Matlab, Java) and resources in the form of: Books & Academic Papers Online Courses and Videos Outlier Datasets Algorithms and Applications Open-source and Commercial Libraries/Toolkits Key Conferences & Journals…

The Causal Inference Book: DAGS and more

Harvard (bio)statisticians Miguel Hernan and Jamie Robins just released their new book, online and accessible for free! The Causal Inference book provides a cohesive presentation of causal inference, its concepts and its methods. The book is divided in 3 parts of increasing difficulty: causal inference without models, causal inference with models, and causal inference from…

Overviews of Graph Classification and Network Clustering methods

Thanks to Sebastian Raschka I am able to share this great GitHub overview page of relevant graph classification techniques, and the scientific papers behind them. The overview divides the algorithms into four groups: Factorization Spectral and Statistical Fingerprints Deep Learning Graph Kernels Moreover, the overview contains links to similar collections on community detection, classification/regression trees and gradient boosting papers…

Causal Random Forests, by Mark White

I stumbled accros this incredibly interesting read by Mark White, who discusses the (academic) theory behind, inner workings, and example (R) applications of causal random forests: EXPLICITLY OPTIMIZING ON CAUSAL EFFECTS VIA THE CAUSAL RANDOM FOREST: A PRACTICAL INTRODUCTION AND TUTORIAL (By Mark White) These so-called “honest” forests seem a great technique to identify opportunities…

Logistic regression is not fucked, by Jake Westfall

Recently, I came across a social science paper that had used linear probability regression. I had never heard of linear probability models (LPM), but it seems just an application of ordinary least squares regression but to a binomial dependent variable. According to some, LPM is a commonly used alternative for logistic regression, which is what…

Propensity Score Matching Explained Visually

Propensity score matching (wiki) is a statistical matching technique that attempts to estimate the effect of a treatment (e.g., intervention) by accounting for the factors that predict whether an individual would be eligble for receiving the treatment. The wikipedia page provides a good example setting: Say we are interested in the effects of smoking on…

People Analytics: Is nudging goed werkgeverschap of onethisch?

In Dutch only: Voor Privacyweb schreef ik onlangs over people analytics en het mogelijk resulterende nudgen van medewerkers: kleine aanpassingen of duwtjes die mensen in de goede richting zouden moeten sturen. Medewerkers verleiden tot goed gedrag, als het ware. Maar wie bepaalt dan wat goed is, en wanneer zouden werkgevers wel of niet mogen of…