Visualizing the inner workings of the k-means clustering algorithm

Originally, I wrote this blog to share this interactive visualization of the k-means algorithm (wiki) which I was all enthusiastic about. However, then I imagined that not everybody may be familiar with k-means, hence, I wrote the whole blog below.  Next thing I know, u/dashee87 on r/datascience points me to these two other blogs that had already…

Sentiment Analysis of Stranger Things Seasons 1 and 2

Jordan Dworkin, a Biostatistics PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania, is one of the few million fans of Stranger Things, a 80s-themed Netflix series combining drama, fantasy, mystery, and horror. Awaiting the third season, Jordan was curious as to the emotional voyage viewers went through during the series, and he decided to examine this…

Text Mining: Pythonic Heavy Metal

This blog summarized work that has been posted here, here, and here. Iain of degeneratestate.org wrote a three-piece series where he applied text mining to the lyrics of 222,623 songs from 7,364 heavy metal bands spread over 22,314 albums that he scraped from darklyrics.com. He applied a broad range of different analyses in Python, the code of which…

Quantifying Gastronomy

A statistical analysis of 4000 recipes and their ingredients: Quantifying Gastronomy  

Summarizing our Daily News: Clustering 100.000+ Articles in Python

Andrew Thompson was interested in what 10 topics a computer would identify in our daily news. He gathered over 140.000 new articles from the archives of 10 different sources, as you can see in the figure below. In Python, Andrew converted the text of all these articles into a manageable form (tf-idf document term matrix…

Beer-in-hand Data Science

Obviously, analysing beer data in high on everybody’s list of favourite things to do in your weekend. Amanda Dobbyn wanted to examine whether she could provide us with an informative categorization the 45.000+ beers in her data set, without having to taste them all herself. You can find the full report here but you may also…

t-SNE, the Ultimate Drum Machine and more

This blog explains t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) by a story of programmers joining forces with musicians to create the ultimate drum machine (if you are here just for the fun, you may start playing right away). Kyle McDonald, Manny Tan, and Yotam Mann experienced difficulties in pinpointing to what extent sounds are similar (ding, dong)…