Tag: process

Visualize graph, diagrams, and proces flows with graphviz.it

Visualize graph, diagrams, and proces flows with graphviz.it

Graphviz.it is a free online tool to create publication-ready diagrams in an interactive fashion. It uses

It uses graphviz-d3-renderer Bower module and adds editor and live preview of code. Try it on Graphviz fiddling website.

Here are some examples:

A diagram of state transitions
A very complex… graph?
Some clusters with subgraphs

The github page hosts more details and you can even follow the development on twitter.

Record2, apparently
Survival of the Best Fit: A webgame on AI in recruitment

Survival of the Best Fit: A webgame on AI in recruitment

Survival of the Best Fit is a webgame that simulates what happens when companies automate their recruitment and selection processes.

You – playing as the CEO of a starting tech company – are asked to select your favorite candidates from a line-up, based on their resumés.

As your simulated company grows, the time pressure increases, and you are forced to automate the selection process.

Fortunately, some smart techies working for your company propose training a computer to hire just like you just did.

They don’t need anything but the data you just generated and some good old supervised machine learning!

To avoid spoilers, try the game yourself and see what happens!

The game only takes a few minutes, and is best played on mobile.

www.survivalofthebestfit.com/ via Medium

Survival of the Best Fit was built by Gabor CsapoJihyun KimMiha Klasinc, and Alia ElKattan. They are software engineers, designers and technologists, advocating for better software that allows members of the public to question its impact on society.

You don’t need to be an engineer to question how technology is affecting our lives. The goal is not for everyone to be a data scientist or machine learning engineer, though the field can certainly use more diversity, but to have enough awareness to join the conversation and ask important questions.

With Survival of the Best Fit, we want to reach an audience that may not be the makers of the very technology that impact them everyday. We want to help them better understand how AI works and how it may affect them, so that they can better demand transparency and accountability in systems that make more and more decisions for us.

survivalofthebestfit.com

I found that the game provides a great intuitive explanation of how (humas) bias can slip into A.I. or machine learning applications in recruitment, selection, or other human resource management practices and processes.

If you want to read more about people analytics and machine learning in HR, I wrote my dissertation on the topic and have many great books I strongly recommend.

Finally, here’s a nice Medium post about the game.

https://www.survivalofthebestfit.com/game/

Note, as Joachin replied below, that the game apparently does not learn from user-input, but is programmed to always result in bias towards blues.
I kind of hoped that there was actually an algorithm “learning” in the backend, and while the developers could argue that the bias arises from the added external training data (you picked either Google, Apple, or Amazon to learn from), it feels like a bit of a disappointment that there is no real interactivity here.

The Magic Sudoku App

The Magic Sudoku App

A few weeks ago, Magic Sudoku was released for iOS11. This app by a company named Hatchlings automatically solves sudoku puzzles using a combination of Computer Vision, Machine Learning, and Augmented Reality. The app works on iPad Pro’s and iPhone 6s or above and can be downloaded from the App Store.

Magic Sudoku App in action.

Magic Sudoku gives a magical experience when users point their phone at a Sudoku puzzle: the puzzle is instantaneously solved and displayed on their screen. In several seconds, the following occurs behind the scenes:

What happens in the ARKit app behind the scenes.

One of the original reasons I chose a Sudoku solver as our first AR app was that I knew classifying digits is basically the “hello world” of Machine Learning. I wanted to dip my toe in the water of Machine Learning while working on a real-world problem. This seemed like a realistic app to tackle.” – Brad Dwyer, Founder at Hatchlings

Particularly the training process of the app interested me. In his blog, Brad explains how they bought out the entire stock of Sudoku books of a specific bookstore and, with the help of his team, ripped each book apart to scan each small square with a number and upload in to a server. In the end, this server contained about 600,000 images, but all were completely unlabeled. Via a simple game, they asked Hatchlings users to classify these images by pressing the number keys on their keyboard. Within 24 hours, all 600,000 images were classified!

Nevertheless, some users had misunderstood the task (or just plainly ignored it) and as a consequence there were still a significant number of misidentified images. So Brad created a second tool that displayed 100 images of a single class to users, who where consequently asked to click the ones that didn’t match. These were subsequently thrown back into the first tool to be reclassified.

Quickly, the developers had enough verified data to add an automatic accuracy checker into both tools for future data runs. Funnily enough, they programmed it in such a way that users were periodically shown already known/classified images in order to check the validity of their inputs and determine how much to trust their answers going forward. This whole process reminds me on a blog I wrote recently, regarding human-computer interactions in reinforcement learning.

For several more weeks, users classified more scanned data so that, by the time the app was launched, it had been trained on over a million images of Sudoku squares. The results were amazing as the application had a 98.6% accuracy on launch (currently above 99% accuracy). One minor deficit was that the app was trained on paper Sudoku’s. However, when it aired, many users wanted to quickly test it and searched for Sudoku images on Google, which the app wouldn’t process that well.

“Problem number one was that our machine learning model was only trained on paper puzzles; it didn’t know what to think about pixels on a screen. I pulled an all nighter that first week and re-trained our model with puzzles on computer screens.

Problem number two was that ARKit only supports horizontal planes like tables and floors (not vertical planes like computer monitors). Solving this was a trickier problem but I did come up with a hacky workaround. I used a combination of some heuristics and FeaturePoint detection to place puzzles on non-horizontal planes.” – Brad Dwyer, Founder at Hatchlings

Brad and his colleagues at Hatchlings still need to work out the business model behind the ARKit Magic Sudoku app, but that’s in the meantime, download the app and let me and them know what you think: subscribe to his medium blog or follow Brad on twitter.

The Dataviz Project: Find just the right visualization

The Dataviz Project: Find just the right visualization

Do you have a bunch of data but you can’t seem to figure out how to display it? Or looking for that one specific visualization of which you can’t remember the name?

www.datavizproject.com provides a most comprehensive overview of all the different ways to visualize your data. You can sort all options by Family, Input, Function, and Shape to find that one dataviz that best conveys your message.

datavizproject overview

Update: look at some of these other repositories here or here.