Category: design

Generative art: Let your computer design you a painting

Generative art: Let your computer design you a painting

I really like generative art, or so-called algorithmic art. Basically, it means you take a pattern or a complex system of rules, and apply it to create something new following those patterns/rules.

When I finished my PhD, I got a beautiful poster of where the k-nearest neighbors algorithms was used to generate a set of connected points.

Marcus Volz’ nearest neighbors graph, via https://marcusvolz.com/#nearest-neighbour-graph

My first piece of generative art.

As we recently moved into our new house, I decided I wanted to have a brother for the knn-poster. So I did some research in algorithms I wanted to use to generate a painting. I found some very cool ones, of which I unforunately can’t recollect the artists anymore:

However, I preferred to make one myself. So we again turned to the work of the author that made the knn-poster: Marcus Volz.

He has written (in R) many other algorithms. And we found that one specifically nicely matched the knn-poster. His metropolis – or generative city:

Marcus’ generative city, via https://marcusvolz.com/#generative-city

However, I wanted to make one myself, so I download Marcus code, and tweaked it a bit. Most importantly, I made it start in the center, made it fill up the whole space, and I made it run more efficient so I could generate a couple dozen large cities quickly, and pick the one I liked most. Here’s the end result:

And in action, in my living room:

Leonardo: Adaptive Color Palettes using Contrast-Ratio

Leonardo: Adaptive Color Palettes using Contrast-Ratio

Leonardo is an open source tool for creating adaptive color palettes; a custom color generator for creating colors based on target contrast ratio. Leonardo is delivered as a Javascript module (@adobe/leonardo-contrast-colors) with a web interface to aid in creating your color palette configurations, which can easily be shared with both designers and engineers. Simply put, Leonardo is for dynamic accessibility of your products.

Read all about Leonardo in this Medium blog post by its author.

The tool is very easy to use. Even I could create a quick palette! Though it’s probably horrendous (due to my colorblindness : ))

Best Geometric Fonts for Modern UI and Logo’s

Best Geometric Fonts for Modern UI and Logo’s

Typography plays a crucial role in design and finding the right font can take a few minutes or a few days. According to Vijay Verma, every font has specific design intent, communicates certain attributes. Fortunately, there are many (free) online libraries to help you these days, such as Google Fonts, MyFonts, Lineto, TypeAtelier, or TypeMates.

Geometric fonts

Geometric fonts are sans-serif typefaces building on geometric shapes like near-perfect circles and squares.

Image result for geometric font
Via

Today many technology brands currently deploy geometric fonts that represent minimalism, simplicity, and cleanliness, like ‚ÄĒ Product Sans by Google, Cereal by Airbnb etc.

Vijay Verma (via)

Design experts argue (here, here) that the geometric fonts below will work very well in modern user interfaces. These fonts are used among others by IKEA, Spotify, NASA, AirBnB, Volkswagen, Apple, Marvel, and Snapchat. Can you guess which is which?

You can click the images to visit the source pages.

Futura

https://uxdesign.cc/getting-futura-right-in-ui-design-bda5bc17f2ee

Gilroy

fonts/radomir-tinkov/gilroy/

Brown

https://lineto.com/typefaces/brown/

Circular

https://lineto.com/typefaces/circular/?tab=specimen

Gordita

https://typeatelier.com/font/gordita/

Cera PRO

https://www.typemates.com/fonts/cera-pro

Sailec

https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/typedynamic/sailec/

Avenir Next

https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/avenir-next-pro/

GT Walsheim

https://www.grillitype.com/typeface/gt-walsheim

TT Commons

https://typetype.org/fonts/commons/

Free Geometric Fonts

Although very aesthetically pleasing, some of these fonts can be pretty expensive if you’re just hobbying. While there are many more fonts out there that may be perfectly free.

Do have a look at Google Fonts, as they provide nearly a 1000 pretty interesting typefaces, all for free!

Moreover, if you’re specifically looking for a geometric font, have a look at these 18 free geometric typefaces!

https://www.cufonfonts.com/zemin/collection/geometric-fonts
Turning the Traveling Salesman problem into Art

Turning the Traveling Salesman problem into Art

Robert Bosch is a professor of Natural Science at the department of Mathematics of Oberlin College and has found a creative way to elevate the travelling salesman problem to an art form.

For those who aren’t familiar with the travelling salesman problem (wiki), it is a classic algorithmic problem in the field of¬†computer science¬†and¬†operations research. Basically, we want are looking for a mathematical solution that is cheapest, shortest, or fastest for a given problem. Most commonly, it is seen as a¬†graph (network)¬†describing the locations of a set of¬†nodes (elements in that network). Wikipedia has a description I can’t improve on:

The Travelling Salesman Problem describes a salesman who must travel between N cities. The order in which he does so is something he does not care about, as long as he visits each once during his trip, and finishes where he was at first. Each city is connected to other close by cities, or nodes, by¬†airplanes, or by¬†road¬†or¬†railway. Each of those links between the cities has one or more weights (or the cost) attached. The cost describes how “difficult” it is to traverse this edge on the graph, and may be given, for example, by the cost of an airplane ticket or train ticket, or perhaps by the length of the edge, or time required to complete the traversal. The salesman wants to keep both the travel costs, as well as the¬†distance¬†he travels as low as possible.

Wikipedia

Here’s a visual representation of the problem and some algorithmic approaches to solving it:

Now, Robert Bosch has applied the traveling salesman problem to well-know art pieces, trying to redraw them by connecting a series of points with one continuous line. Robert even turned it into a challenge so people can test out how well their travelling salesman algorithms perform on, for instance, the Mona Lisa, or Vincent van Gogh.

Just look at the detail on these awesome Dutch classics:

Read more about this awesome project here: http://www.math.uwaterloo.ca/tsp/data/art/

P.S. Why do Brits and Americans have this spelling feud?! As a non-native, I never know what to pick. Should I write modelling or modeling, travelling or traveling, tomato or tomato? I got taught the U.K. style, but the U.S. style pops up whenever I google stuff, so I am constantly confused! Now I subconciously intertwine both styles in a single text…

OriginLab’s Graph Gallery: A blast from the past

OriginLab’s Graph Gallery: A blast from the past

Continuing my recent line of posts on data visualization resources, I found another repository in my inbox: OriginLab’s GraphGallery!

If I’m being honest, I would personally advice you to look at the dataviz project instead, if you haven’t heard of that one yet.

However, OriginLab might win in terms of sentiment. It has this nostalgic look of the ’90s, and apparently people really used it during that time. Nevertheless, despite looking old, the repo seems to be quite extensive, with nearly 400 different types of data visualizations:

Quantity isn’t everything though, as some of the 400 entries are disgustingly horrible:

There’s so much wrong with this graph…

What I do like about this OriginLab repo is that it has an option to sort its contents using a random order. This really facilitates discovery of new pearls:

Thanks to Maarten Lambrechts for sharing this resource on twitter a while back!

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

treevis.net – A Visual Bibliography of Tree Visualizations

Last week I cohosted a professional learning course on data visualization at JADS. My fellow host was prof. Jack van Wijk, and together we organized an amazing workshop and poster event. Jack gave two lectures on data visualization theory and resources, and mentioned among others treevis.net, a resource I was unfamiliar with up until then.

treevis.net is a lot like the dataviz project in the sense that it is an extensive overview of different types of data visualizations. treevis is unique, however, in the sense that it is focused on specifically visualizations of hierarchical data: multi-level or nested data structures.

Hans-J√∂rg Schulz — professor of Computer Science at Aarhus University in Denmark — maintains the treevis repo. At the moment of writing, he has compiled over 300 different types of hierachical data visualizations and displays them on this website.

As an added bonus, the repo is interactive as there are several ways to filter and look for the visualization type that best fits your data and needs.

Most resources come with added links to the original authors and the original papers they were first published in, so this is truly a great resources for those interested in doing a deep dive into data visualization. Do have a look yourself!

The Mental Game of Python, by Raymond Hettinger

The Mental Game of Python, by Raymond Hettinger

YouTube recommended I’d watch this recorded presentation by Raymond Hettinger at PyBay2019 last October. Quite a long presentation for what I’d normally watch, but what an eye-openers it contains!

Raymond Hettinger is a Python core developer and in this video he presents 10 programming strategies in these 60 minutes, all using live examples. Some are quite obvious, but the presentation and examples make them very clear. Raymond presents some serious programming truths, and I think they’ll stick.

First, Raymond discusses chunking and aliasing. He brings up the theory that the human mind can only handle/remember 7 pieces of information at a time, give or take 2. Anything above proves to much cognitive load, and causes discomfort as well as errors. Hence, in a programming context, we need to make sure programmers can use all 7 to improve the code, rather than having to decypher what’s in front of them. In a programming context, we do so by modularizing and standardizing through functions, modules, and packages. Raymond uses the Python random module to hightlight the importance of chunking and modular code. This part was quite long, but still interesting.

For the next two strategies, Raymond quotes the Feinmann method of solving problems: “(1) write down a clear problem specification; (2) think very, very hard; (3) write down a solution”. Using the example of a tree walker, Raymond shows how the strategies of incremental development and solving simpler programs can help you build programs that solve complex problems. This part only lasts a couple of minutes but really underlines the immense value of these strategies.

Next, Raymond touches on the DRY principle: Don’t Repeat Yourself. But in a context I haven’t seen it in yet, object oriented programming [OOP], classes, and inherintance.

Raymond continues to build his arsenal of programming strategies in the next 10 minutes, where he argues that programmers should repeat tasks manually until patterns emerge, before they starting moving code into functions. Even though I might not fully agree with him here, he does have some fun examples of file conversion that speak in his case.

Lastly, Raymond uses the graph below to make the case that OOP is a graph traversal problem. According to Raymond, the Python ecosystem is so rich that there’s often no need to make new classes. You can simply look at the graph below. Look for the island you are currently on, check which island you need to get to, and just use the methods that are available, or write some new ones.

While there were several more strategies that Raymond wanted to discuss, he doesn’t make it to the end of his list of strategies as he spend to much time on the first, chunking bit. Super curious as to the rest? Contact Raymond on Twitter.